Saturday at PulpFest

Jul 23, 2016 by

Argosy 20-06-12There’s still time to get in on the action. The PulpFest dealers’ room will be open today from 10 AM until 4:45 PM. Located in Battelle South exhibition hall on the third floor of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, our dealers’ room will feature exhibitors selling and trading pulp magazines and related materials, digests, vintage paperbacks, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, first-edition hardcovers, series books, dime novels, original art, Big Little Books, B-movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time-radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age as well as pulp-related comic books and games. That’s why PulpFest is known as the “pop culture center of the universe!”

Single-day memberships to PulpFest will be available for $20 for Saturday and $10 for Sunday. Children who are fifteen and younger and accompanied by a parent, will be admitted free of charge. Members will be able to register for the convention at any time during regular dealers’ room hours. To help things move smoothly, please bring along a completed registration form. You can download a copy by clicking here. Paper forms will also be available at the door. Those who have prepaid for their memberships, will also be able to pick up their registration packets at our door. Please visit our registration page for further details.

For those visiting PulpFest for the day, you can also use the Chestnut Street Garage for parking. Rates vary based on time, but at this writing, $14 will get you a day’s parking. Additional parking is available at the Convention Center underground garage. Again, rates are time-based and, at this writing, $14 will get you parking for 12 hours with no in and out privileges. Click here for a more detailed look at parking near the Hyatt Regency. Alternately, if you don’t mind walking a few blocks, there are many inexpensive options. Click here for an interactive parking map of Columbus and search near 350 North High Street.

Our Saturday afternoon programming will start at 1 PM with our New Fictioneers readings. Afterward, Ron Fortier will moderate a New Pulp Fiction Panel on “Writing Hero Pulp.” It will be followed by a presentation on Anthony Tollin’s Sanctum Books featuring Mr. Tollin and Doc Savage author Will Murray.

Amazing Stories 70-05For pulp fans who like games, gaming fans who like pulps, or just people who like to have fun, PulpFest 2016 will be organizing a gaming track. Many of the themes found in the world of modern games resonate from the pulps and the stories published in those magazines. There are games based on Conan, the Cthulhu Mythos, space operas such as Doc Smith’s Lensman series, westerns, mysteries and, of course, the pulp heroes. Role-playing games, or RPGs, are especially noted for quick action, cliff-hangers, and adventure.

The PulpFest 2016 gaming track will begin at 10 AM on Saturday and last until 10 PM or thereabouts. All games will be set up in the Clark Room, located on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency. The only requirements to play games at PulpFest 2016 are a PulpFest membership, your imagination, and a desire to have a good time. So if you enjoy pulps and you enjoy games, PulpFest will be the place to be.

Come out to PulpFest 2016 where you can explore our substantial dealers’ room and find exciting pulp fiction and books to read. Then stop by our game room where you can save Earth from aliens, explore new planets circling far-flung stars, or seek out ancient artifacts and knowledge.  You’ll learn how to play a variety of new games and “boldly go where no man has gone before.”

The PulpFest dealers’ room will closing be at 4:45 PM today. This should allow plenty of time for people to prepare for our Saturday Night Dinner at Dick’s Last Resort, a get-together arranged by registration and volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers. Dick’s is located at 343 North Front Street, just a few minutes’ walk from the Hyatt Regency Columbus in the Arena District. If you don’t plan to attend PulpFest‘s group meal, there are plenty of other restaurants close to the hotel. You’ll find a guide to the many fine downtown restaurants by clicking here.

Saturday evening’s events will include the PulpFest 2016 Business Meeting. Two lucky PulpFest members who prepay for their membership, book a room for three nights at our host hotel, and choose to attend our business meeting will receive free memberships to PulpFest 2017. You must provide proof of your stay at the Hyatt Regency Columbus and be present at the drawing to receive your prize. It will be followed by the 2016 Munsey Award Presentation.

Our programming for Saturday evening will include Our Guest of Honor presentation, featuring science fiction author and pulp fan Ted White. The editor emeritus of AMAZING STORIES, Mr. White will speak about his career, AMAZING STORIES, science fiction fandom, the pulps, and much, much more from 7:30 to 8:15 in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency. Pulp collector and scholar Doug Ellis — the co-founder of the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention — will also be on hand with a presentation on 120 Years of THE ARGOSY — The World’s First Pulp Magazine. All PulpFest members are very much welcome to attend.

Our evening will conclude with the annual PulpFest Saturday Night Auction. Featuring material consigned by our membership, any member of PulpFest 2016 can submit items to the auction. Your PulpFest badge number will be used as your auction bidder and/or seller number. All lots submitted must have a minimum value of $20. All lots that do not receive a bid of $20 or more will be passed. If you plan to offer an auction lot with a reserve price, your reserve must be $50 or more. No lots with a reserve price of less than $50 will be accepted. PulpFest reserves the right to reject any auction material that is unlikely to meet our minimum bid or reserve price standards as well as our content standards. The convention charges sellers 10% of the selling price for anything sold in the auction.We will begin taking consignments for the auction when our dealers’ room opens at 10 AM. Barry will be accepting material for our auction near the entrance to the PulpFest dealers’ room. The sooner you submit your consignment to our auction coordinator, Barry Traylor, the more likely that it will be included in our auction. All auction lots must be submitted to Barry prior to 2 PM on Saturday, July 23. For additional information, please click on the auction link on our programming schedule.

Spicy Adventure Stories (July 1935)Click on the “Our Auction” link under our homepage banner for highlights of this year’s auction. We’ll have a half-dozen early Arkham House books, including a very collectible copy of H. P. Lovecraft’s THE OUTSIDER AND OTHERS. We’ll also have over two hundred pulps from the collection of the late Woody Hagadish.

You can find additional details about these and all of our presentations by clicking the 2016 Schedule Button found at the top of our home page. Each event on the schedule is linked to a post that provides further information on that event. Just click on the event’s title.

If you are not from the Columbus area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can try calling 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there has been a cancellation. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor  or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Other sites include www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpcourtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, and the Experience Columbus lodging page at http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/stay.

PulpFest 2016 will continue tomorrow. Our dealers’ room will be open to all members from 10 AM to 2 PM as our exhibitors pack up. If you are coming just for the day, please be aware that buying and selling opportunities may be limited. Admission to the convention for Sunday, July 24, will be $10, the cost of our annual program book, THE PULPSTER.

Please join us in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!” You’ll have a FANTASTIC time!

(Although Harold Lamb’s “The Caravan of the Dead” was the cover feature to the June 12, 1920 ARGOSY — featuring front cover art by Fred W. Small — the real highlight of the issue was Murray Leinster’s novelette “The Mad Planet.” Often anthologized, Leinster’s story was called “One of the greatest Munsey scientific romances” by science fiction historian Sam Moskowitz. Pulp scholar Doug Ellis will be discussing such highlights in his presentation on ARGOSY on Saturday, July 23.

Our guest of honor, Ted White, served as the editor of AMAZING STORIES and FANTASTIC from October 1968 until October 1978, upgrading the quality of both magazine’s fiction while showcasing a variety of talented illustrators. One such artist was John Pederson, Jr., whose front cover for the May 1970 AMAZING STORIES was the first original cover painting for White’s magazine. Pederson would paint a half dozen covers for AMAZING and its companion. He also contributed covers to GALAXY, IF, THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, and WORLDS OF TOMORROW.

Granted, the PulpFest auctions are a bit more tame than the sale of a slave girl, painted by the incomparable H. J. Ward’s as the cover for the July 1935 issue of SPICY ADVENTURE STORIES. Nevertheless our auctions are quite exciting. Plan to attend PulpFest 2016 and find out for yourself why it’s called “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!”)

Friday at PulpFest

Jul 22, 2016 by

Amazing Stories 47-09PulpFest 2016 enters it second day, following a successful night of dealer set-up, early registration, early-bird shopping, and a full slate of exciting programming. If you missed our first day, there’s still plenty of action to come.

From 9 to 10 AM today, the dealers’ room will be open only to dealers for set-up. All visitors will also be able to register for the convention this morning — beginning at 9 PM — and at any time during regular dealers’ room hours. Three-day memberships will be available at the door for $40. Single day memberships will be available for $20 for Friday or Saturday and $10 for Sunday. Children who are fifteen and younger and accompanied by a parent, will be admitted free of charge. To help things move smoothly, please bring along a completed registration form. You can download a copy by clicking here. Paper forms will also be available at the door. Those who have prepaid for their memberships, will also be able to pick up their registration packets at our door. Please visit our registration page for further details.

For those visiting PulpFest for the day, you can also use the Chestnut Street Garage for parking. Rates vary based on time, but at this writing, $14 will get you a day’s parking. Additional parking is available at the Convention Center underground garage. Again, rates are time-based and, at this writing, $14 will get you parking for 12 hours with no in and out privileges. Click here for a more detailed look at parking near the Hyatt Regency. Alternately, if you don’t mind walking a few blocks, there are many inexpensive options. Click here for an interactive parking map of Columbus and search near 350 North High Street.

The dealers’ room will open to all at 10 AM and will remain open until 4:45 PM. Located in Battelle South exhibition hall on the third floor of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, our dealers’ room will feature exhibitors selling and trading pulp magazines and related materials, digests, vintage paperbacks, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, first-edition hardcovers, series books, dime novels, original art, Big Little Books, B-movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time-radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age as well as pulp-related comic books and games. That’s why PulpFest is known as the “pop culture center of the universe!”

Western Story 1932-09-03Our afternoon programming will start at 1 PM with our New Fictioneers readings. Our evening programming will begin shortly before 7 PM as PulpFest chairman Jack Cullers offers an official welcome to all attendees. Friday night’s programming will include our FarmerCon XI presentation which will feature a panel of writers who will discuss their collaborations with Grand Master of Science Fiction Philip José FarmerPulpFest favorite David Saunders starts off our celebration of the 120th anniversary of the first pulp magazine with “The Artists Who Make ARGOSY — 120 Years of Sensational Pulp Art;” our salute to the 90th anniversary of the first science fiction magazine continues when Joseph Coluccio, president of the Pittsburgh Area Fantasy and Science Fiction Club, explores the history of AMAZING STORIES during the pulp era; closing out the evening will be pulp historian Laurie Powers with a look at “LOVE STORY MAGAZINE and the Romance Pulp Phenomenon” and author and pop culture scholar Will Murray examining “WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE and the Evolution of the Pulp Western,” both part of PulpFest‘s remembrance of “A Century of the Specialty Pulp.”

You can find additional details about these and all of our presentations by clicking the 2016 Schedule Button found at the top of our home page. Each event on the schedule is linked to a post that provides further information on that event. Just click on the event’s title. All of our programming events will take place in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency. Watch for the “panels” banner and you’re there.

If you are not from the Columbus area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can try calling 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there has been a cancellation. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor  or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Other sites include www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpcourtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, and the Experience Columbus lodging page at http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/stay

PulpFest 2016 will continue on Saturday and Sunday. It concludes at 2 PM on Sunday, July 24. Please join us in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!” You’ll have a FANTASTIC time!

(Artist Malcolm Smith‘s cover painting for the September 1947 issue of  AMAZING STORIES illustrated Edmond Hamilton’s “The Star Kings,” one of the author’s finest space operas. Smith’s first cover for AMAZING was the January 1942 number. He also contributed covers and illustrations to FANTASTIC ADVENTURES and Ziff-Davis’s MAMMOTH line of pulp magazines.

Walter M. Baumhofer — best remembered for his classic covers that appeared on DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE — was one of many great artists whose work — including the September 3, 1932 issue — graced the front covers to Street & Smith’s WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE.)

PulpFest 2016 Begins Today

Jul 21, 2016 by

Skipper 37-01PulpFest 2016 will begin this afternoon at 4 PM, as our dealers begin to erect their displays for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!” All members — dealers included — will be able to register for the convention from 4 to 8 PM, right outside our dealers’ room in Battelle South, located across from the Regency Ballroom’s foyer in the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Everyone can pick up their registration packets at this time. To help things move smoothly, please bring along a completed registration form. You can download a copy by clicking here or the link found on our registration page.

There will be free early-bird shopping in the dealers’ room from 6 to 9 PM for loyal attendees who help to defray the convention’s costs by staying three nights at our host hotel. The cost is $30 for those who stay elsewhere. Our full programming slate for the evening will begin shortly after 9 PM with a look at The Skipper and The Whisperer, two pulp superheroes that debuted eighty years back in 1936. Our presenter will be Will Murray, author of “The All-New Wild Adventures of Doc Savage and Tarzan” and a noted expert on the pulps and pulp history.

PulpFest will also be celebrating the 150th anniversary of the birth of science fiction author H. G. Wells with a presentation by Garyn G. Roberts, winner of the 2013 Munsey Award. Professor Roberts has written extensively about the pulps, both professionally and as a fan. His work, THE PRENTICE HALL ANTHOLOGY OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY, a college level textbook, is notable for the attention paid to the pulp magazines.

You can find additional details about these and all of our presentations by clicking the 2016 Schedule Button found at the top of our home page. Each event on the schedule is linked to a post that provides further information on that event. Just click on the event’s title.

When our programming is over, PulpFest members are welcome to socialize together in the Hyatt Regency’s Big Bar on 2. Buy a round for your table and talk about the magazines we love and collect. “What’s your favorite Doc Savage adventure? How many people died in ‘Death Reign of the Vampire King?’ Did Joan Randall have a thing for Gragg the Robot? Remember when Conan bit off that vulture’s head in ‘A Witch Shall Be Born?’ How the hell do you say Cthulhu? And what about Tsathoggua? Do you pronounce that with a lisp? Why does the Phantom Detective wear a top hat? Who the hell is Pinky Jenkins?” These are just some of the mysteries you might clear up with your pals — old and new — at PulpFest 2016.

If you are not from the Columbus area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can try calling 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there has been a cancellation. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor  or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Other sites include www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpcourtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, and the Experience Columbus lodging page at http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/stay

For those of you who have not yet registered for PulpFest 2016, Thursday evening will be an ideal time to do so. Four-day memberships will be available for $40. There will be no single-day memberships available for Thursday only. Children who are fifteen and younger and accompanied by a parent, will be admitted free of charge. Please visit our registration page for further details. Members will also be able to register for the convention on Friday morning, beginning at 9 PM, and at any time during regular dealers’ room hours. Single day memberships will be available for $20 for Friday or Saturday and $10 for Sunday.

From 4 PM to 11 PM on Thursday, the dealers’ room will be open for exhibitors to set up their displays. At this point, we urge all of our dealers to take full advantage of our generous load-in and set-up period. Since our dealers’ room will be located in the Greater Columbus Convention Center, unloading and loading for those selling at the convention will be at the center’s loading dock.

Amazing ad-1926To reach the convention center’s loading dock, go north on High Street until you come to Warren Street.  Turn right on Warren and follow it to Summit Street. Summit becomes 3rd Street.  Stay on this street and pass the exit to I-670.  As soon as you pass the exit, you will see a sign that reads, “Right lane ends.” At this sign there is a ramp that goes off to the right.  Take this ramp and it curls around to the docks. The convention plans to have people there to help dealers unload.  After unloading, follow the ramp away from the dock and it takes you to the Chestnut Street garage area.

Remember that we’ll also be offering early-bird shopping in the dealers’ room from 6 to 9 PM on Thursday evening, an extra three hours of selling opportunities to people who are ready to buy!

Although the focus of PulpFest is pulp magazines and related materials, digests, vintage paperbacks, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, first-edition hardcovers, series books, dime novels, original art, Big Little Books, B-movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time-radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age as well as pulp-related comic books and games are also allowed.

(The first issue of THE SKIPPER went on sale with a December 1936 cover date. The magazine’s lead character, Captain John Fury — the Skipper — was a variant of Doc Savage. The series was written by Laurence Donovan, under the house name Wallace Brooker. Front cover art — including the second issue, dated January 1937 — was by  Lawrence Donner Toney, During the 1930s and 1940s, Toney painted covers for CLUES, COMPLETE STORIES, WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE, WILD WEST WEEKLY, and other pulps, all published by Street & Smith.

The fiction of Herbert George Wells played a prominent role in the early years of AMAZING STORIES. Along with Ray Cummings, Edgar Allan Poe, and Jules Verne, Wells is mentioned in the advertising copy for the first issue of the new science fiction magazine. The ad ran in the April 1926 issue of RADIO NEWS.

During his three years as editor and publisher of the first science-fiction magazine, Hugo Gernsback turned to Wells’ fictional output for nearly thirty stories, reprinting such classics as “The First Men in the Moon,” “The Time Machine,” and “The War of the Worlds” in his flagship title and its companions.

Both H. G. Wells and The Skipper — along with The Whisperer — will be profiled during PulpFest’s opening night programming, scheduled to begin at 9:10 PM this evening. We hope to see you in Columbus for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!)

One Week to Go!

Jul 14, 2016 by

2016 Post CardPulpFest 2016 will begin on Thursday, July 21. The dealers’ room will be open to registered sellers to set up their displays from 4 to 11 PM. Early registration for all convention attendees will take place outside the dealers’ room in the Battelle South exhibition hall on the third floor of the Greater Columbus Convention Center from 4 to 8 PM. There will be early-bird shopping available to PulpFest members who will be staying at the Hyatt Regency Columbus or those who elect to purchase an early-bird membership from 6 to 9 PM. Our full slate of programming for Thursday evening will get underway at 9:10 PM.

If you have not yet booked a room for your stay, call 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there has been a cancellation. Please book a room for three nights and register now for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con.”

If you can’t find a room at the Hyatt Regency Columbus, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center at www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpAlternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

Below, you’ll find our complete schedule for the entire convention. To learn more about a particular programming event, click on its title link. We look forward to seeing you in a week.

Thursday, July 21st

Dealers’ Room

4:00 PM – 11:00 PM — Dealers’ Room Set-Up

4:00 PM – 8:00 PM — Early Registration

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM — Dealers’ Room Opens for Early-Bird Shopping

Programming

9:10 – 9:55 PM — Street & Smith’s Second Stringers — The Whisperer and The Skipper (Will Murray)

10:05 – 10:50 PM — Traveling through Time with H. G. Wells  (Garyn Roberts)

11:00 PM — Pulps in the Pub (join your friends in the hotel bar and talk pulp)

Friday, July 22nd

Dealers’ Room

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM — Early Registration and Dealers’ Room Set-Up

10:00 AM – 4:45 PM — Dealers’ Room Open to All

Programming

1:00 – 4:15 PM — New Fictioneers Readings — see full schedule on day of show

6:55 – 7:00 PM — Welcome to PulpFest 2016 (Convention Chairman Jack Cullers)

7:00 – 7:40 PM — FarmerCon XI — Collaborating with Philip José Farmer (moderator Paul Spiteri with authors Danny Adams, Christopher Paul Carey, and Win Scott Eckert)

7:50 – 8:35 PM — The Artists of THE ARGOSY —  120 Years of Sensational Pulp Artists (David Saunders)

8:45 – 9:30 PM — AMAZING STORIES — The First Science-Fiction Pulp (Joseph Coluccio, president of the Pittsburgh Area Fantasy and Science Fiction Club)

9:40 – 10:20 PM — A Century of the Specialty Pulp — LOVE STORY MAGAZINE and the Romance Pulp Phenomenon (Laurie Powers)

10:30 – 11:15 PM — 100 Years of the Specialty Pulp — WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE and the Evolution of the Pulp Western (Will Murray)

Saturday, July 23rd

Dealers’ Room

10:00 AM – 4:45 PM — Dealers’ Room Open to All

10:00 AM – 10:00 PM — Gaming Track in the Clark Room, Second Floor

Programming

1:00 – 1:50 PM — New Fictioneers Readings — see full schedule on day of show

2:00 – 2:50 PM — The AMAZING World of New Pulp (moderator Ron Fortier with authors Barbara Doran, Win Scott Eckert, Andy Fix, and Jeff Fournier on “Writing Hero Pulp”)

3:00 – 3:50 PM — Ten Years in The Shadow’s Sanctum — Anthony Tollin’s Sanctum Books (with Will Murray)

5:00 – 6:50 PM — PulpFest 2016 Group Meal at Dick’s Last Resort (Volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers)

7:00 – 7:20 PM — 2016 Munsey Award (to be presented by a previous award winner)

7:30 – 8:15 PM — Our Guest of Honor (Ted White, editor emeritus of AMAZING STORIES)

8:25 – 9:10 PM — 120 Years of THE ARGOSY — The World’s First Pulp Magazine  (Doug Ellis)

9:20 –  9:40 PM — PulpFest 2016 Business Meeting (meet the convention organizers)

10:00 PM – ??— Saturday Night at the Auction (John Gunnison, auctioneer)

 

Sunday, July 24th

Dealer’s Room

10:00 AM – 2:00 PM — Dealers’ Room Open to All (many dealers will be packing up; buying opportunities may be limited)

Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

The PulpFest 2016 dealers’ room will be in the Battelle South exhibition hall on the third floor of the Greater Columbus Convention Center.

All PulpFest 2016 programming will take place in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus.

The PulpFest 2016 Gaming Track will take place in the Clark Room  on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus.

For questions about our programming, please write to our programming director Mike Chomko at mike@pulpfest.com.

For questions about our New Fictioneers Readings, please write to our afternoon programming director Chuck Welch at chuck@pulpfest.com.

For questions about our dealers’ room, please write to our convention chairperson Jack Cullers at jack@pulpfest.com.

(The PulpFest 2016 post card features Frank R. Paul’s cover art from the August 1927 issue of AMAZING STORIES, illustrating H. G. Wells’ “War of the Worlds.”)

Gaming at PulpFest 2016

Jun 24, 2016 by

Infinite CityPulpFest was founded on the premise that the pulps had a profound effect on American popular culture, reverberating through a wide variety of mediums — comic books, movies, paperbacks and genre fiction, television, men’s adventure magazines, radio drama, and even video and role-playing games. The summertime destination for fans and collectors of vintage popular fiction, art, and related materials, PulpFest seeks to honor the pulps by drawing attention to the many ways such magazines have inspired writers, artists, film directors, software developers, and other creators over the decades.

Science fiction has likewise played a strong role in the development of American popular culture. Introduced to pulp readers through the scientific romances found in the Munsey magazines and other general fiction pulps, science fiction became its own genre when Hugo Gernsback premiered AMAZING STORIES — the first continuing science fiction magazine — in the spring of 1926. AMAZING and the pulps that followed it — WONDER STORIES, ASTOUNDING STORIES, STARTLING STORIES, among others — served to inspire the worlds of STAR TREK, STAR WARS, BABYLON 5, Steampunk, and other expressions of contemporary popular culture including role-playing games and board games.

PulpFest introduced a gaming track to its programming schedule in 2015. Many of the themes found in the world of modern games resonate from the pulps and the stories published in those magazines. There are games based on Conan, the Cthulhu Mythos, space operas such as Doc Smith’s Lensman series, westerns, mysteries and, of course, pulp heroes.

This year, in honor of the ninetieth anniversary of the debut of AMAZING STORIES, PulpFest will have an array of role-playing games and board games set in the science fiction genre. Game players will be able to explore other worlds and adventure in outer space.

We will have two tables running Pathfinder RPG games. Although these games have a fantasy setting, the Pathfinder world that we’ll be exploring is one where the impact of science fiction is felt.  Expect aliens with blasters and dimensional gates, as well as orcs and dragons. The Columbus chapter of the Ohio Pathfinder Society will be managing our Pathfinder games.

Ohio’s Rogue Cthulhu group will be running Cthulhu Mythos adventures that are set in modern times and in the future.  Stride across alien worlds and face eldritch horrors, fly in star ships to battle alien races such as the Mi-Go, and stand against entities from other worlds using science. The mythos developed in the pulps by H. P. Lovecraft and other writers — Robert Bloch, Robert E. Howard, Henry Kuttner, and Frank Belknap Long, and so on — has inspired a wide range of both role-playing and board games. Rogue Cthulhu will be managing a variety of games to thrill and enjoy.

The Fellowship of the White Star will be running role-playing games at two tables.  The Fellowship adventures are set on the earth of the early twentieth century. Intrepid adventurers battle everything from mad scientists trying to conquer the world to invading aliens to creatures of darkness.  Join them as they strive to keep their families and countries safe from dark science.

PulpFest 2016 will also be featuring a number of board games.  One table will be running and teaching a number of games that can be played in an hour or two.  We’ll have ALIEN FRONTIERS, CHRONONAUTS, DESTINATION NEPTUNEINFINITE CITYMEGAMANIOLOGY, and others.  By popular demand, another table will be running ELDRITCH HORROR, a board game featuring a band of investigators battling entities from the Cthulhu Mythos.

Come out to PulpFest 2016 where you can explore our substantial dealers’ room and find exciting pulp fiction and books to read. Then stop by our game room where you can save Earth from aliens, explore new planets circling far-flung stars, or seek out ancient artifacts and knowledge.  You’ll learn how to play a variety of new games and “boldly go where no man has gone before.” As of June 21, the Hyatt Regency Columbus has a small number of rooms available for July 21 through July 23. Please see our post “There Are Rooms at the Hyatt!

At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(The PulpFest 2016 gaming track will begin at 10 AM on Saturday, July 23, and last until 10 PM or thereabouts. All games will take place in the Clark Room, located on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency. Watch for the PulpFest PLAY banner outside the entrance to our game room. There will be eight tables set up where a variety of board games, card games, and role-playing games will be presented. PulpFest is also working with several gaming companies to provide prizes for our game-playing members.

The box art for INFINITE CITY — a board game designed by Brent Keith and published by Alderac Entertainment Group — is by Charles J. Urbach.)

Ten Years in The Shadow’s Sanctum — Anthony Tollin’s Sanctum Books

Jun 23, 2016 by

Shadow 1One of PulpFest‘s longtime supporters has been Anthony Tollin, the publisher of Sanctum Books. On Saturday, July 23, at 3 PM, PulpFest 2016 will salute the tenth anniversary of Sanctum Books. Our celebration of the occasion will take place in our programming area, located in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus.

Anthony Tollin launched his Sanctum double novel pulp reprints in July 2006. During the past decade, Sanctum Books has reprinted all 182 DOC SAVAGE pulp novels, all 24 of Paul Ernst’s AVENGER novels, the 14 WHISPERER novels from the original pulp series and more than 220 SHADOW novels — all in non-flaking editions with the classic color covers and original interior illustrations, plus comprehensive historical articles and features. Some of these features have included rare radio scripts as well as reprints of Street & Smith comic book stories such as the Iron Munro yarns of Theodore Sturgeon. Additionally, Sanctum Books has reprinted selected NICK CARTER, PHANTOM DETECTIVE, and THE SKIPPER adventures in the double novel format. The publisher has also added THE SPIDER and THE BLACK BAT to its publishing schedule. It goes without saying that Sanctum Books has been one of the leading pulp reprint houses for the last ten years.

Please join Anthony Tollin and his contributing editor Will Murray as they recall Sanctum’s first decade, preview its new anniversary special and annuals, and showcase some of its upcoming projects —  including a hardcover collection of the complete 1940 – 1942 SHADOW newspaper strips.

The only way that you can join this celebration of “Ten Years in The Shadow’s Sanctum” is to attend PulpFest 2016, “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con.” Find out “Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?” only at PulpFest. Taking place in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center, it begins on Thursday, July 21 and runs through Sunday, July 24. As of June 21, the Hyatt Regency Columbus has a small number of rooms available for July 21 through July 23. Please see our post “There Are Rooms at the Hyatt!

At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

As of June 1, 2016, the Hyatt Regency is sold out on Friday, July 22. Please read our post “Friday Night Sell-Out” for alternatives. Thank you.

(Back in 2006, the advertising copy for the first of Sanctum Books’ double novel reprints read: “The Shadow returns in two of his greatest pulp adventures: “Crime, Insured” (acclaimed as Walter Gibson’s greatest thriller) and “The Golden Vulture” (revised by Gibson from Lester Dent’s 1932 tryout novel that won him the Doc Savage contract), featuring writers Walter B. Gibson and Lester Dent (writing as “Maxwell Grant”), and artists George Rozen and Edd Cartier. The first volume of this new series reproduces both original covers by George Rozen, plus all of the original interior illustrations by Edd Cartier. This book also includes new historical background articles by popular culture historians Anthony Tollin and Will Murray (who collaborated posthumously with Dent on Seven new Doc Savage novels previously published by Bantam).”

Over the past ten years, Sanctum’s format has not changed: two or three novels per book, the original covers and interior illustrations, and some sort of historical articles or materials are featured in each volume of the series. The only thing that has changed is the price: the early volumes cost $12.95, while today’s Sanctum reprints can be had for $14.95. They’re a tremendous value at both prices!)

PulpFest 2016 and the New Fictioneers

Jun 22, 2016 by

It’s called new pulp – stories by modern writers who recreate the style of fiction that appeared in the pulp magazines of yore. Back then, the authors who labored for the rough paper industry liked to call themselves scribes, word-slingers, penny-a-worders, and, perhaps the most favored term of all, fictioneers. Join PulpFest as we celebrate today’s fictioneers — the authors writing the new pulp fiction! On Friday and Saturday, we’ll feature authors reading from their works and answering a few questions from the audience.

Reading from their works on Friday, July 22*

dayworldDanny Adams is the author of the early medieval historical novel LEST CAMELOT FALL (Musa, 2014) and coauthor, again with Philip José Farmer, of the short science fiction novel THE CITY BEYOND PLAY (PS Publishing, 2007/2012). Adams has also been published in ABYSS & APEX, ASIMOV’S SCIENCE FICTION, IDEOMANCER, MYTHIC DELIRIUM, NOT ONE OF US, PARADOX, SPACE & TIME, STAR*LINE, STRANGE HORIZONS, and THE WORLDS OF PHILIP JOSE FARMÉR. He also reviews science fiction and fantasy books for PUBLISHERS WEEKLY.

Adams will read from his new novel, A HOLE IN WEDNESDAY. Phillip José Farmer began this prequel DAYWORLD novel, but did not complete it. Set some time before the events in the original trilogy, the novel nonetheless has direct links to the acclaimed series, exploring the developing world and antecedent characters who vigorously challenge the life in which they find themselves trapped.

bloodChristopher Paul Carey will be reading from BLOOD OF ANCIENT OPAR, the fifth installment in Philip José Farmer’s Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series, which makes its worldwide debut this year at PulpFest. A sequel to Carey’s HADON, KING OF OPAR and a pivotal installment in the series, BLOOD OF ANCIENT OPAR spins an epic tale of royal intrigue and revolution in Opar, the famed city of gold and jewels that made its first appearance in the pulps over a hundred years ago.

Chris is the coauthor with Philip José Farmer of THE SONG OF KWASIN, and the author of EXILES OF KHO, HADON, KING OF OPAR, and BLOOD OF ANCIENT OPAR. His short fiction may be found in numerous anthologies. He is a senior editor at Paizo, working on the award-winning Pathfinder Roleplaying Game as well as the Pathfinder Tales novel line, and has edited numerous collections, anthologies, and novels. He holds a master’s degree in Writing Popular Fiction from Seton Hill University.

foggReading from METEOR HOUSE CHAPBOOK NO. 1, Win Scott Eckert pulls back the veil on the previously untold tale of Mr. Phileas Fogg’s fateful encounter with the legendary masked rider of the plains and his faithful companion — an episode suppressed (with good reason!) by M. Verne himself from the final publication of his classic AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS.

Eckert is the coauthor with Philip José Farmer of the Pat Wildman novel THE EVIL IN PEMBERLEY HOUSE, and the coauthor with Farmer of the forthcoming fourth novel in Farmer’s “Secrets of the Nine” series, THE MONSTER ON HOLD, furthering the titanic saga of Doc Caliban’s ongoing battle against the dark manipulators who hold the secret to eternal life, the Nine. His tales of Zorro, The Avenger, The Phantom, The Lone Ranger, The Scarlet Pimpernel, Hareton Ironcastle, Captain Midnight, The Green Ghost, Sexton Blake, The Domino Lady, Doc Ardan, and Sherlock Holmes can be found in the pages of various character-themed anthologies from Moonstone, or in anthologies such asTHE WORLDS OF PHILIP JOSE FARMÉR (Meteor House), TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN (Black Coat Press), and TALES OF THE WOLD NEWTON UNIVERSE (Titan Books).

MEBorn and raised in the heart of the heartland — Columbus, Ohio  — John Hegenberger is the author of several upcoming series: Stan Wade (LAPI in 1959), Eliot Cross (Columbus-based PI in 1988), Tripleye (the first PI agency on Mars), and Ace Hart (western gambler from Wyoming to Arizona in 1877). He’s the father of three, a tennis enthusiast, collector of silent films and OTR, a hiker, Francophile, B.A. Comparative Lit., pop culture author, ex-Navy, ex-marketing exec at Exxon, AT&T, and IBM, happily married for 45 years and counting.

John is an active Member of SFWA, PWA and ITW. He’s sold numerous stories to GALAXY, AMAZING, and various SF anthologies. Hegenberger will be reading one of his stories, “Cicatrix,” originally published in AMAZING back in 1990. It’s the premiere story to feature TRIPLEYE, the first private eye agency on Mars. A collection of these tales will be published later this year by Black Opal Books.

Reading from his work on Saturday, July 23rd*

duanespurlockDuane Spurlock writes adventure and fantasy-oriented action tales. His most recent publication was last year’s AIRSHIP HUNTERS, with co-writer Jim Beard.

He has also worked as an illustrator, including Brian Showers’ THE BLEEDING HORSE AND OTHER GHOST STORIES which won the Children of the Night Award from the Dracula Society. Spurlock says, “Genre fiction and popular media have narrative strengths that speak to readers in powerful ways, no matter what era the stories are set in, no matter what the tropes or expectations may be for a given genre or type of story.”

* Exact times for the authors will be announced at PulpFest 2016

We look forward to seeing you at “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” from July 21 through July 24 at the beautiful Hyatt Regency and the city’s spacious convention center in the exciting Arena District of Columbus, Ohio. Please join us as we celebrate pulp fiction and art both old and new. As of June 21, the Hyatt Regency Columbus has a small number of rooms available for July 21 through July 23. Please see our post “There Are Rooms at the Hyatt!

At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(Throughout history, fictioneers have not been the only pulpsters. The pulp magazines of yore and the new pulp fiction of today have enjoyed the talents of many fine artists. The new Meteor House novel, A HOLE IN WEDNESDAY features cover art by Keith Howell. To learn more about this talented artist, please visit his website Intelligent Designs or the Keith Howell Facebook page.

Christopher Paul Carey’s novel BLOOD OF ANCIENT OPAR is graced with cover art by Bob Eggleton, who also painted a handful of covers for AMAZING STORIES during the TSR years. A commercial artist, Eggleton began working in the science fiction field in 1983. An extremely versatile artist, he has worked in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and as a landscape artist. His illustrations have been featured on magazines, books, posters, trading cards, jigsaw puzzles, and more. He’s also worked as a conceptual artist in the film and amusement park industries. Eggleton has won the Hugo Award for Best Artist eight times.)

120 Years of THE ARGOSY — The World’s First Pulp Magazine

Jun 21, 2016 by

Frank A. MunseyThe leading American magazines of the late 1800s – HARPER’S, CENTURY MAGAZINE, and SCRIBNER’S – were beyond the financial and the intellectual reach of the average U. S. citizen. It was left to Frank A. Munsey – a man about whom it has been suggested, “contributed to the journalism of his day the talent of a meat packer, the morals of a money changer and the manner of an undertaker” – to deliver the first American periodical specifically intended for the common man: “A magazine of the people and for the people, with pictures and art and good cheer and human interest throughout.”

Born in Maine, Frank Munsey traveled to New York City and founded a children’s weekly, THE GOLDEN ARGOSY, in 1882. Working largely on credit, he struggled for years, building his circulation through advertising and sheer determination. Deciding that the future lay in the adult market, he started MUNSEY’S WEEKLY in 1889, soon converting it to MUNSEY’S MAGAZINE. In 1893, convinced that a magazine could only be successful if the price was right, he slashed the price of MUNSEY’S  to a dime and marketed it directly to newsdealers, essentially cutting out the middle man.

As the circulation of MUNSEY’S  climbed to hundreds of thousands of copies, the publisher converted THE ARGOSY to an adult magazine, similarly priced and modeled after it’s brethren. Envisioning a new kind of magazine, Frank Munsey wrote, “We want stories . . . . not dialect sketches, not washed out studies of effete human nature, not weak tales of sickly sentimentality, no ‘pretty’ writing . . . . We do want fiction in which there is a story, a force, a tale that means something – in short a story. Good writing is as common as clam shells, while good stories are as rare as statesmanship.”

Argosy 1896-12In October 1896, THE ARGOSY became the first all-fiction magazine. Two months later in a cost-cutting move, it began to be printed on the wood-pulp paper he used for his daily newspaper and the rough-paper fiction magazine, or pulp, was born. Shortly thereafter, its circulation had doubled to about 80,000 copies per issue. By 1907, the year the periodical celebrated its 25th anniversary, its circulation had reached a half million copies, earning its publisher about $300,000 per year.

As its readership grew, THE ARGOSY was bound to attract some imitators. Street & Smith, the longtime publisher of dime novels and story papers, was first to meet the call, debuting THE POPULAR MAGAZINE with its November 1903 issue. As the circulation of his competitors’ magazine grew, it became apparent to Munsey that there was room on the newsstand for more than one pulp. At the end of 1904, the publisher debuted THE ALL-STORY MAGAZINE. It was soon joined by other Munsey magazines – THE SCRAP BOOK and THE RAILROAD MAN’S MAGAZINE (both 1906), THE OCEAN/THE LIVE WIRE (1907), and THE CAVALIER (1908).

Although not the most influential of pulp magazines — pulp scholar Ed Hulse has suggested that title belongs to THE ALL-STORY, a magazine that featured the first published stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs, Max Brand, and A. Merritt, plus the iconic characters John Carter, Tarzan, and Zorro — ARGOSY was widely read by a wide range of readers and enjoyed a long life. It lasted as a pulp — absorbing other titles and taking on new names — for over 1500 issues and nearly fifty years. Following its August 1943 issue, it was converted to the slick format, reducing its fiction content and eventually becoming a men’s adventure magazine. As such, it lasted into the 1970s, its final number dated November 1979.

Please join PulpFest 2016 at 8:25 PM on Saturday, July 23, as we welcome pulp collector and scholar Doug Ellis to our programming stage in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus for a discussion of “120 Years of THE ARGOSY — The World’s First Pulp Magazine.” Doug has been collecting and writing about pulp magazines for over thirty years. In 1987, he founded Tattered Pages Press, a publishing house devoted to reprinting fiction from and books about –the pulps. He’s the editor of the celebrated fanzine PULP VAULT  and co-author — joining John Locke and John Gunnison — of THE ADVENTURE HOUSE GUIDE TO THE PULPS. He’s also the author of UNCOVERED: THE HIDDEN ART OF THE GIRLIE PULPS and the co-founder of the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention. In recognition of his service to the pulp community, Doug received a Lamont Award in 1996.

Argosy 47-07During his presentation, Doug will touch briefly on the early years of ARGOSY, prior to its conversion to a pulp magazine. He will then turn his attention to the beginnings and the evolution of the pulp, examining the long history of the magazine, including its mergers with other pulps, sale to Popular Publications, conversion to a bedsheet magazine, and later, to a men’s adventure magazine. Doug also plans to visit the many story types and great authors featured in the general fiction magazine, as well as its various series characters such as H. Bedford-Jones’ John Solomon, George F. Worts’ Peter the Brazen, and J. U. Giesy’s and Junius B. Smith’s Semi Dual.

Start making your plans to attend “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” as we salute the 120th anniversary of the birth of the pulp magazine from July 21 through July 24 in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. “You’ll be in for a great adventure” at PulpFest, the pop culture center of the universe. Please remember that the Hyatt Regency Columbus is sold out of rooms for July 21 through July 23. You’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center at www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpAlternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(In 1882, Frank A. Munsey founded THE GOLDEN ARGOSY, a children’s weekly. Fifty years later, ARGOSY publisher William DeWart wrote “The History of the ARGOSY Magazine,” published in the December 10, 1932 number. It was illustrated with a line drawing of the magazine’s founder.

Beginning with its December 1896 issue — nearly 120 years ago — Munsey converted THE ARGOSY to the first pulp fiction magazine. For over 1500 issues and nearly fifty years, it battled on as a pulp. Following its August 1943 issue, it was converted to the slick format, reducing its fiction content and eventually becoming a men’s adventure magazine. As such, it lasted into the 1970s, its final number dated November 1979.

During its early issues as a slick, ARGOSY employed painted covers, including the July 1947 number with cover art by Charles Dye, a graduate of the American Academy of Art. Moving to New York City, Dye’s first freelance assignments were interior story illustrations for Popular Publications’ western pulp magazines. He later sold covers to Popular’s ADVENTURE, ARGOSY, and other pulps. During the 1950s, he found steady work contributing covers and interior story illustrations to men’s adventure magazines, including SAGA, OUTDOOR LIFE, and ARGOSY.)

 

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Our Guest of Honor — Ted White

Jun 20, 2016 by

Amazing Stories 26-04In the spring of 1926, publisher Hugo Gernsback introduced AMAZING STORIES, the first continuing science fiction magazine. Within months, the new specialty magazine was selling over 100,000 copies per issue. Gernsback had tapped a vein of wonder, shared by lonely individuals prone to “imaginative flights of fancy.” Next would come AMAZING STORIES ANNUAL, published in the summer of 1927 and featuring Edgar Rice Burroughs’ “The Mastermind of Mars.”AMAZING STORIES QUARTERLY followed in the winter of 1928. Then, in the August 1928 number of AMAZING STORIES, Gernsback introduced his readers to E. E. “Doc” Smith’s “The Skylark of Space” and Philip Francis Nowlan’s “Armageddon—2419 AD,” featuring Anthony “Buck” Rogers. These two space operas would help color science fiction for well over a decade.

Although Gernsback would lose control of his magazine in 1929, the founding of AMAZING STORIES signaled the separation of science fiction into its own category.  Before long, AMAZING was joined by other science fiction pulps, including Gernsback’s own WONDER STORIES and Clayton’s ASTOUNDING STORIES OF SUPER-SCIENCEIt was in the latter magazine — retitled ASTOUNDING SCIENCE FICTION — that the genre would enter its golden age, under the guidance of editor John W. Campbell. Decades later, AMAZING STORIES likewise attained a golden age, thanks to the heroic efforts of editor Ted White.

In his May 1969 editorial for AMAZING, White likened the development of the New Wave in science fiction to the 1960s revolution in rock music and the emergence of heavy metal and acid rock. He pointed out that this music was able to coexist beside the more melodic rhythms of the Beach Boys and others. He also recognized that heavy rock was drawing upon its roots, in rhythm and blues, to express its new voice.

White saw no reason why science fiction should not follow the same pattern. Not only could all forms of science fiction exist side by side — the traditional alongside the modern — but the modern had itself developed from science fiction’s roots. By publishing both forms of science fiction in AMAZING, White could make it possible for the old and the new to influence each other.

Ted White strove to attract good fiction and new writers to the magazines. However, because he was paying the lowest rates in the field, he knew he wouldn’t have first shot at the best fiction around, but he might have a chance at some of the best experimental fiction, which had no ready market elsewhere, and thereby attract those writers who didn’t otherwise click with the establishment. Piers Anthony, Richard A. Lupoff, Barry N. Malzberg, David R. Bunch, R. A. Lafferty, Alexei Panshin, Christopher Priest, James Tiptree, Jr., Avram Davidson, Philip José Farmer, Gordon Eklund, Robert Silverberg, George Alec Effinger, F. M. Busby, Jack Dann,George Zebrowski, Thomas Monteleone, John Shirley, and others all found a home in Ted White’s AMAZING. They were joined by some of science fiction’s most exciting artists: Jeff Jones, Mike Kaluta, John Pederson, Jr., Joe Staton, Doug Chaffee, Vaughn Bode, Dan Adkins,  and most significantly Mike Hinge.

Fantasy & SF 2014-03-04PulpFest is very pleased to welcome as its 2016 Guest of Honor, author, editor, musician, and science-fiction and pulp fan Ted White. Winner of the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer in 1968 and nominated as Best Professional Editor or for Best Professional Magazine throughout most of the seventies, Mr. White will speak about his career, AMAZING STORIES, science fiction fandom, the pulps, and much, much more on Saturday evening, July 23, from 7:30 to 8:15 in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency.

We look forward to seeing you at “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” from July 21 through July 24 at the beautiful Hyatt Regency and the city’s spacious convention center in the exciting Arena District of Columbus, Ohio. Please join us as editor emeritus Ted White helps PulpFest celebrate ninety years of AMAZING STORIES! Remember that the Hyatt Regency Columbus is sold out of rooms for July 21 through July 23. At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(Our guest of honor continues to publish professionally after more than sixty years of practicing his craft. His short story, “The Uncertain Past,” appeared in the March & April 2014 number of THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION — featuring front cover art by Kent Bash — while “The Philistine” can be found in the October 2015 issue of ANALOG SCIENCE FICTION AND FACT.

AMAZING STORIES likewise continues to be published, ninety years after the appearance of its first issue. That number — dated April 1926 — featured front cover art by Frank R. Paul, the “grandfather of science fiction art.” Revived in 2012 by longtime science-fiction fan Steve Davidson as an online magazine, you can find the new AMAZING STORIES at http://amazingstoriesmag.com/. It’s also available as an ebook via Amazon.com.)

The AMAZING World of New Pulp

Jun 17, 2016 by

legends-new-pulp-coverOne of PulpFest‘s hallmarks has been its willingness to seek out and try new ideas. This was amply demonstrated by its decision in 2009 to present readings by “The New Fictioneers,” contemporary authors whose fiction is inspired by a love of the pulps. Since then, several other conventions have added a “New Pulp” track to their programming schedules.

PulpFest‘s dedication to new ideas and “New Pulp” continues with its annual panel moderated by Ron Fortier, a professional writer for over forty-five years. In 2007, Ron teamed up with illustrator Rob Davis to start Airship 27 Productions and built a home for new adventures featuring many of the pulp characters long remembered by our community. Ron’s own creation, the undead avenger known as Brother Bones, would certainly have been at home with Paul Ernst’s Doctor Satan in the pages of WEIRD TALES and Norvell Page’s The Spider. Ron has also penned the adventures of pulp heroes Captain Hazzard and the Domino Lady, as well as pop culture icons The Green Hornet and The Phantom.

In recent posts on this page, we’ve delved into the world of the specialty pulp, one of the themes of this year’s PulpFest.  The first of these — Street & Smith’s DETECTIVE STORY MAGAZINE premiered with its October 5, 1915 issue. The first pulp magazine successfully dedicated to one fiction genre, its success would lead to a proliferation of pulp magazines devoted to a single theme or genre, eventually culminating in the single-character pulp or hero pulp. For our 2016 “New Pulp” panel, Fortier has set his sights on the topic, “Writing the Pulp Hero.” He’ll be joined by four of the leading practitioners of contemporary pulp fiction.

Barbara Doran is a science fiction, fantasy, and mystery writer. Her father introduced her to the work of S. J. Perelman and P. G. Wodehouse, as well as Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov. Her earliest influences however, were pulp heroes such as Doc Savage and The Shadow. Another influence was The Green Hornet and Kato. These characters inspired Barbara’s first published work, CLAWS OF THE GOLDEN DRAGON, released in 2015 by Airship 27. Most recently, Barbara penned an adventure of Sinbad the Sailor for the fifth volume of Airship’s SINBAD — THE NEW ADVENTURES.

One of the founding members of the “New Pulp” movement, Win Scott Eckert is co-author (with Philip José Farmer) of the Wold Newton novel THE EVIL IN PEMBERLEY HOUSE, concerning the daughter of a certain bronze-skinned pulp hero, and its sequel, THE SCARLET JAGUAR. Win also edited and contributed to MYTHS FOR THE MODERN AGE: PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER’S WOLD NEWTON UNIVERSE, nominated for a Locus Award in 2007, and wrote the critically acclaimed CROSSOVERS: A SECRET CHRONOLOGY OF THE WORLD, published by Black Coat Press. He has also written tales featuring many adventure and pulp hero characters, including The Avenger, Captain Midnight, The Green Hornet, Honey West, The Scarlet Pimpernel, Sherlock Holmes, and Zorro. Win is currently finishing another incomplete Farmer manuscript, THE MONSTER ON HOLD, which will almost certainly debut at a future PulpFest. The latter features Philip José Farmer’s celebrated character, Doc Caliban.

Nominated for a Pulp Ark New Pulp Award as the 2016 “Best New Writer,” the work of Andy Fix has appeared in several anthologies of “New Pulp” fiction. His story, “Face to Face with Agent Loki,” appeared in the fifth volume of Airship 27’s celebrated SECRET AGENT X series. Andy also contributed a tale to LEGENDS OF NEW PULP FICTION, an all-new anthology to benefit new pulp publisher, editor, and writer Tommy Hancock, recently diagnosed with congestive heart failure. Andy is currently working on an air war story for Airship 27 and is featured on the Global Adventure Society Pulpcast, which “covers all aspects of Pulp Culture.”

Like Andy Fix, Jeff Fournier contributed to LEGENDS OF NEW PULP FICTION and is featured on the Global Adventure Society Pulpcast. And like Barbara Doran, Jeff has penned an adventure of Sinbad the Sailor. It appeared in the fourth volume of Airship’s SINBAD — THE NEW ADVENTURES.

Our panel, “The AMAZING World of New Pulp,” will take place at 2 PM on Saturday, July 23 in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus. Watch for the PulpFest PANELS banner outside the entrance to our programming room. PulpFest 2016 —  the destination for fans and collectors of vintage popular fiction, art and related materials — will begin on Thursday, July 21, and run through Sunday, July 24.  Join us at the Hyatt Regency Columbus and the Greater Columbus Convention Center for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!” You’ll have a FANTASTIC time.

Please remember that the Hyatt Regency Columbus is sold out of rooms for July 21 through July 23. At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention CenterAlternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(In case you’re wondering about the term “fictioneer,” most dictionaries place its origin during the early twenties. However, it was relatively commonplace in magazines between 1910 and 1920 and has been spotted in works dating back to the mid-nineteenth century. H. Bedford-Jones used it in a series of articles called “The Graduate Fictioneer,” originally published by AUTHOR & JOURNALIST in the early thirties. In 1932, a group of Wisconsin writers got together and called themselves “The Milwaukee Fictioneers.” At various times, Robert Bloch, Fredric Brown, August Derleth, Ralph Milne Farley, Lawrence Keating, Ray Palmer and Stanley Weinbaum were members of this group. In the late 30s, Popular Publications started Fictioneers, Inc., a pulp line that paid its authors half the going market rate of a penny a word. E. Hoffmann Price, soldier-of-fortune, and prolific pulp author, used the term in his memoirs from the pulp years, BOOK OF THE DEAD — FRIENDS OF YESTERYEAR: FICTIONEERS & OTHERS, published by Arkham House in 2001. Pulp historian and anthologist John Locke likewise used it in his non-fiction anthology PULP FICTIONEERS: ADVENTURES IN THE STORYTELLING BUSINESS, published by Adventure House in 2004.

LEGENDS OF NEW PULP FICTION, an all-new anthology to benefit new pulp publisher, editor, and writer Tommy Hancock, features front cover art by Douglas C. Klauba.)

WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE and the Evolution of the Pulp Western

Jun 15, 2016 by

Buffalo Bill Stories 1909-04-24The western story got its start with James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales, a series of five novels that fictionally adapted the adventures of frontiersman Daniel Boone. In the years following Cooper’s Natty Bumppo stories, authors such as Bret Harte, Francis Parkman, and Mark Twain further expanded the field.

According to an essay written by pulp author John A. Saxon and published in 1945 by WRITER’S DIGEST, the western story became a genre of its own during the second half of the 19th century. In 1869, writer Edward Zane Carroll Judson convinced hunter, scout, and showman William F. Cody to lend his name and reputation to a fictionalized account of his life, “Buffalo Bill, King of the Borderman,” originally serialized in Street & Smith’s NEW YORK WEEKLY. Phenomenally received, Judson found a public hungry for further adventures of the real life hero of the American frontier. Thus started “. . . the fictionalized form of the Western story . . . based partly on fact, but mostly on imagination.”

Given the great success of Street & Smith’s Buffalo Bill tales, nickel weeklies and dime novels devoted to western heroes and outlaws soon followed: DEADWOOD DICK LIBRARYDIAMOND DICK LIBRARY, JAMES BOYS WEEKLY, KLONDIKE KIT LIBRARY, WILD WEST WEEKLY, and more. These as well as stories featuring detective heroes such as Nick Carter and Old Sleuth and sports heroes such as Frank Merriwell, reigned supreme for nearly forty years. Then, following the introduction of the pulp magazine by Frank A. Munsey in 1896, the story papers and dime novels began to give way to the more economical rough-paper periodicals.

Western Story 19-09-05The first all-western pulp magazine was introduced by Street & Smith when they converted their tired old story paper, NEW BUFFALO BILL WEEKLY, to WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE with its September 5, 1919 number. Within a year, the magazine reached a circulation of 300,000 copies and began to be released weekly, a status it enjoyed for the next twenty-five years. Soon thereafter, the magazine began publishing the western fantasies of poet turned pulp writer Frederick Schiller Faust – better known as Max Brand – and really took off. By the late 1920s, WESTERN STORY was competing against countless imitators – ACE-HIGH, COWBOY STORIES, FRONTIER, GOLDEN WEST, LARIAT, NORTH-WEST STORIES, RANCH ROMANCES, WEST, and others.

Following the collapse of the world economy in 1929, ten-cent western pulps began to flood the market as publishers sought reliable markets to help them keep afloat. Beginning with DIME WESTERN MAGAZINE — introduced by Popular Publications in late 1931 — many western pulps took on a more mature, often violent tone. Others, including Ned Pines’ Standard Magazines, coupled the western with the highly popular single character magazine. With managing editor Leo Margulies riding herd over “thrilling tales of the gallant West where danger lurks and cowboys are supermen,” Standard introduced Jim Hatfield in TEXAS RANGERS, Wayne Morgan in MASKED RIDER WESTERN, and other western pulp superheroes in their own magazines.

Street & Smith’s WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE would last for thirty years and nearly 1300 issues. Following its launch in 1919, it would change the pulp fiction magazine industry forever. At its peak, it was released once a week and sold 500,000 copies of each issue. Like its predecessor in the specialty pulp market — DETECTIVE STORY MAGAZINE — it inspired a host of imitators and fostered the western genre, helping the pulps to survive the Great Depression and the Second World War.

At 10:30 PM on Friday, July 22, please join noted popular culture historian Will Murray to PulpFest‘s programming stage in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus for an examination of “WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE and the Evolution of the Pulp Western,” part of our celebration of “A Century of the Specialty Pulp.”

Will Murray has been researching and writing about the pulps for nearly half a century. One of the most respected authorities on the pulp magazine, having authored countless articles and books, including WORDSLINGERS: AN EPITAPH FOR THE WESTERNMurray was the ghost-writer for about forty of the Destroyer action-adventures novels. He has also written nineteen Doc Savage novels and a fully authorized Tarzan novel, RETURN TO PAL-UL-DON. A second is forthcoming.

Western Story 31-12-12Start making your plans to attend “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” as we salute 100 years of the specialty pulp from July 21 through July 24 in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. “You’ll have a rip-snorting time” at the pop culture center of the universe. Please remember that the Hyatt Regency Columbus is sold out of rooms for July 21 through July 23. At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention CenterAlternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(THE BUFFALO BILL STORIES was the first publication devoted to fiction about frontiersman William F. Cody. A weekly publication “devoted to border history,” it debuted with its May 18, 1901 number and was published by Street & Smith. To learn more about the evolution of the pulp western, read John Dinan’s THE PULP WESTERN, Ron Goulart’s CHEAP THRILLS, and Will Murray’s WORDSLINGERS. Then come to PulpFest 2016 and hear Will Murray discuss the genre’s roots and development.

According to dime novel scholar J. Randolph Cox, most of the covers for Street & Smith periodicals published during the early 1900s were drawn by Charles L. Wrenn, Marmaduke Russell, Ed Johnson, and J. A. Cahill. The particular artist of the April 24, 1909 issue — pictured above — is not known.

The work of Stanley L. Wood — an English illustrator noted for his paintings featuring horses in action, often featured with boys’ adventure stories — was used as the cover art to the first issue of WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE, dated September 5, 1919. Later issues of the rough paper magazine — including the December 12, 1931 number — featured covers by the “King of the Pulps,” Walter M. Baumhofer. The artist is best remembered for his classic covers that appeared on DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE.)

LOVE STORY MAGAZINE and its Romantic Sisters

Jun 14, 2016 by

Love Story 37-05-29Although the Munsey group published the first specialized pulp magazines — beginning with THE RAILROAD MAN’S MAGAZINE in 1906, followed by THE OCEAN in 1907 — both pulps were a mixture of fact and fiction. It would be up to Street & Smith to originate the specialized pulp fiction magazine in the fall of 1915 when it introduced DETECTIVE STORY MAGAZINE to the reading public.

Originally published twice a month, DETECTIVE STORY became a weekly before the end of its second year of publication. Despite its great success, the new pulp did not immediately inspire many imitators. It would be up to Street & Smith itself to develop the trend: WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE arrived in 1919, followed by LOVE STORY in 1921, SEA STORIES in 1922, and SPORT STORY MAGAZINE in 1923. It was not until 1924 that the single-genre fiction pulp would start to take off as other publishers began to release their own specialty pulps. Many more specialty pulps would follow in the ensuing years, culminating in single-character magazines such as THE SHADOW and DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE.

When Street & Smith’s LOVE STORY MAGAZINE was launched in 1921, the pulp fiction magazine industry was changed forever. During the Roaring TwentiesLOVE STORY’s circulation would grow until it hit 600,000 in the early 1930s, a record that would never be broken by any other pulp magazine. The romance genre, along with the western, would become the best-selling pulp fiction genres through the Depression and World War II. Almost every pulp publisher, at one point or another, would attempt to break into the “love pulp” field. Sometimes their attempts would be successful, other times their magazines would fade after a few issues. And never would they be able to topple the circulation record set by LOVE STORY MAGAZINE.

In her talk, “LOVE STORY MAGAZINE and the Romance Pulp Phenomenon,” Laurie Powers will discuss the magazine, its famous editor Daisy Bacon, and the romance pulps that followed in its footsteps. Accompanied by many rare photos and artifacts, Laurie will tell how LOVE STORY began, what made it so popular, and how Daisy Bacon influenced its success. In addition, she will discuss LOVE STORY’s competition, including the long-running ALL-STORY LOVE STORIES — a pulp that was managed by LOVE STORY’s original editor and Daisy’s rival, Amita Fairgrieve — and the longest-running pulp fiction magazine, RANCH ROMANCES, a pulp that would spearhead a brand new genre, the romance western. Laurie’s look at LOVE STORY and its romantic “sisters” will take place at 9:40 PM on Friday, July 22 in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency.

Laurie Power’s interest in pulp fiction began in 1999 when she discovered that her paternal grandfather, Paul S. Powers, (1905–1971) had been a successful writer of stories that appeared in magazines such as WEIRD TALES, WILD WEST WEEKLY, WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE, REAL DETECTIVE TALES, and many more.  During her research, she discovered her grandfather’s unpublished manuscript, PULP WRITER: TWENTY YEARS IN THE AMERICAN GRUB STREET, which was published by the University of Nebraska in 2007. Since then, Laurie has been very active in the community of pulp magazine historians and collectors. In recent years she has been writing a biography of Daisy Bacon, editor of LOVE STORY MAGAZINE. Laurie also publishes Laurie’s Wild West, an Internet blog site that has become a favorite destination for those interested in the pulps.

Join “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” as we salute a century of the specialty pulp from July 21 through July 24 in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. You’ll have a LOVEly time. Please remember that the Hyatt Regency Columbus is sold out of rooms for July 21 through July 23. At www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, you’ll find a list of area hotels courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention CenterAlternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(Modest Stein began contributing covers to the pulp market in 1910, selling to both the Munsey and Street & Smith chains. By the twenties, he was largely employed by the latter, painting covers for ASTOUNDING SCIENCE FICTION, CLUES, CRIME BUSTERS, DOC SAVAGE, FAR WEST ILLUSTRATED, LOVE STORY MAGAZINE — including the May 29, 1937 issue — ROMANTIC RANGE, THE SHADOW, UNKNOWN, and other Street & Smith titles. Following the publisher’s 1949 exit from the pulp field, Stein worked predominantly as a portrait artist. He died in 1958.)

The Artists Who Make ARGOSY — 120 Years of Sensational Pulp Art

Jun 8, 2016 by

Argosy 19-10-11On Friday, July 23, at 7:50 PM, one of PulpFest‘s most popular presenters, artist and art historian David Saunders, returns to our programming stage in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency Columbus for a look at “The Artists Who Make ARGOSY.

The first all-fiction pulp magazine, THE ARGOSY was founded as a children’s weekly by publisher Frank A. Munsey in 1882. Originally titled THE GOLDEN ARGOSY, it was converted to a general fiction pulp magazine with its December 1896 number. Within ten years, it was selling a half million copies of each issue. Through numerous title and format variations, as well as editorial and publisher changes, the magazine soldiered on for nearly a century, its final number dated November 1979. As a pulp, it lasted for over 1500 issues and nearly fifty years. Following its August 1943 number, it was converted to the slick format, reduced its fiction content, and eventually became a men’s adventure magazine.

Today, ARGOSY is sought after for its authors and its series characters. H. Bedford-Jones, Max Brand (Frederick Faust), Edgar Rice Burroughs, Ellis Parker Butler, Borden Chase, Walt Coburn, Ray Cummings, Norbert Davis, Lester Dent, Ralph Milne Farley, C. S. Forester, Erle Stanley Gardner, Zane Grey, L. Patrick Greene, O. Henry, Robert E. Howard, L. Ron Hubbard, Otis Adelbert Kline, Harold Lamb, Murray Leinster, Gordon MacCreagh, Johnston McCulley, Fred MacIsaac, A. Merritt, Clarence E. Mulford, Hugh Pendexter, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Theodore Roscoe, Charles Alden Seltzer, Perley Poore Sheehan, Upton Sinclair, Francis Stevens, W. C. Tuttle, W. Wirt, Cornell Woolrich, George F. Worts, and countless other talented writers found a home in its rough-paper pages. Popular series characters featured in the magazine included Captain Horatio Hornblower, Carson Napier, Dr. Kildare, Gillian Hazeltine, Hopalong Cassiday, Jan of the Jungle, Jimmie Cordie, John Carter, John Solomon, Madame Storey, Montana Kid, Peter the Brazen, Semi Dual, Sheriff Henry, Singapore Sammy, Tarzan, Thibaut Corday, Zorro, and many others.

argosy 33-09-23But what about the days when ARGOSY was being read by hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children? Although a favorite writer or character was enough to convince a regular ARGOSY reader to part with his or her hard-earned money at the newsstand, it was often a pulp magazine’s artwork that reeled in the new or the casual reader. Like every great pulp magazine, ARGOSY employed some of the best artists in the business: Rudolph Belarski, Ernest Chiriacka, Rafael M. DeSoto, Charles Dye, Marshall Frantz, Robert A. Graef, P. J. Monahan, Roger B. Morrison, Stockton Mulford, John R. Neill, Clinton Pettee, Norman Rockwell, Norman Saunders, Fred W. Small, Paul Stahr, Peter Stevens, Emmett Watson, and others.

Join David Saunders at PulpFest 2016 for a survey of ARGOSY covers and story illustrations, plus rarely seen original cover paintings and drawings, as well as rare photographs of many of the “Artists Who Make ARGOSY,” part of this year’s celebration of the 120th anniversary of the first pulp magazine — THE ARGOSY.

Born in 1954, David Saunders is a New York artist. His work has been collected worldwide and can be found in the Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Hirschhorn Museum of Art in Washington, DC. He has taught art at Yale, Oberlin, and the Kansas City Art Institute, as well as art schools in France, Korea, Mexico and Japan.

David’s father was the legendary illustrator, Norman Saunders. His mother, Ellene Politis Saunders, worked at Fawcett Publications as Chief Executive Editor for WOMAN’S DAY. In 1972, David became his father’s business secretary, which started a long project to catalog his father’s 7,000 published illustrations. He spent the next seventeen years gathering published examples of his father’s work from used bookshops and submitting each new entry to his father’s inspection. What began as a sentimental hobby for a father and son grew into an impressive archive of 20th century American illustration. After his father’s death in 1989, he completed the archive on his own. He interviewed his father’s surviving associates to record their oral histories. These transcripts helped to broaden his viewpoint of the popular culture publishing industry and also documented vital information about the lives of other artists. Some of this material has been published as biographical profiles in ILLUSTRATION MAGAZINE and several coffee-table art books on pulp artists.

Argosy 47-03David is, quite probably, the foremost scholar of American pulp illustrators. His free public website, Field Guide to Wild American Pulp Artists, has over three-hundred biographical profiles of these creators of popular culture. David continues to research, document, and promote a greater appreciation of pulp artists. To find out more, please visit davidsaunders.biz, normansaunders.com, and theillustratedpress.com.

After checking out David’s credentials, be sure to get ready to attend “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” as we salute the 120th anniversary of the birth of the pulp magazine from July 21 through July 24 in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. “You’ll be in for a great adventure” at PulpFest, the pop culture center of the universe.

(Over its years as a pulp and later a men’s adventure magazine, ARGOSY was the full package: good authors, good stories, and good art.

Born in San Francisco, Fred W. Small moved to New York City in 1910. Within two years, he was working exclusively for the Munsey magazines, contributing covers and interior art to THE ALL-STORY, ARGOSY — including the October 11, 1919 issue — CAVALIER, and MUNSEY’S MAGAZINE. His last pulp magazine illustrations appeared in 1921.

Robert A. Graef studied art at the Pratt Institute of Brooklyn. Soon after graduation, he began illustrating for a variety of magazines and newspapers. During the First World War, he contributed patriotic recruitment posters to the war effort. He added pulp magazines to his markets during the mid-twenties, most notably ARGOSY — including the September 23, 1933 number. Over the years, he contributed a great deal of art to the Munsey magazine and other pulps.

During its early years as a slick, ARGOSY employed painted covers, including the March 1947 number with cover art by Charles Dye. The artist contributed many interior story illustrations and covers to Popular Publications’ western pulp magazines as well as ADVENTURE and ARGOSY. He later contributed the same to the men’s adventure market.

Good authors, good stories, and good art made ARGOSY a great magazine. Witness the nearly forty years of covers illustrated above.)

Collaborating with a Grand Master — FarmerCon XI

Jun 7, 2016 by

Hole in WednesdaySince 2011, PulpFest has hosted FarmerCon, a convention that began in Peoria, Illinois, the hometown of Philip José Farmer. Originally a gathering of Farmer fans figuratively, and literally, right outside Phil’s back door, FarmerCon offered presentations, dinners, and even picnics at the author’s house.  After the passing of Phil and Bette Farmer in 2009, it was decided to take FarmerCon on the road to broaden its horizons. By holding the convention alongside events such as PulpFest, Farmer fans get a variety of programming and a room full of pulp and book dealers to enjoy. As always, PulpFest is  very pleased to welcome its FarmerCon members to our joint conference.

We’re equally pleased that year after year, FarmerCon has asked to help with our programming. On Friday, July 22, at 7 PM, please join PulpFest as we turn our programming stage over to our FarmerCon XI members and “Collaborating with Philip José Farmer.” England’s Paul Spiteri, who served as co-editor of FARMERPHILE and the collection PEARLS OF PEORIA, and also collaborated with Phil, finishing the short story “Getting Ready to Write,”will be moderating the panel. Joining Paul will be Danny Adams, Christopher Paul Carey, and Win Scott Eckert.

Danny Adams collaborated with Phil on the short novel THE CITY BEYOND PLAY (PS Publishing, 2007) and has also just completed A HOLE IN WEDNESDAY, a work that Farmer began before he wrote the three novels DAYWORLD, DAYWORLD REBEL, and DAYWORLD BREAKUP. The latest Adams/Farmer collaboration will debut at PulpFest in July. Farmer’s Dayworld series imagines a severely overcrowded future that cures the overpopulation problem by “stoning” most of the population each day.

Christopher Paul Carey collaborated with Farmer on the novel THE SONG OF KWASIN, the third climactic volume in the Ancient Opar/Khokarsa series. He has continued the series with the prequel novella EXILES OF KHO, and the novellas HADON, KING OF OPAR and BLOOD OF ANCIENT OPAR. The latter will also be debuting at PulpFest in July.

Win Scott Eckert edited the anthology MYTHS FOR THE MODERN AGE: PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER’S WOLD NEWTON UNIVERSE and collaborated with Phil on THE EVIL IN PEMBERLEY HOUSE, the novel that introduced adventuress Patricia Wildman. He has continued the Pat Wildman series with the novella THE SCARLET JAGUAR, and will be finishing another incomplete Farmer manuscript, THE MONSTER ON HOLD, which will almost certainly debut at a future PulpFest. The latter features Philip José Farmer’s celebrated character, Doc Caliban.

To most pulp enthusiasts, the late Philip José Farmer is best known as “A prolific and popular science fiction writer who shocked readers in the 1950s by depicting sex with aliens and challenged conventional pieties of the genre with caustic fables set on bizarre worlds of his own devising.” In science-fiction circles, Farmer is most remembered for his novels. Called “sprawling, episodic works that gave him room to explore the nuances of a provocative premise while indulging his taste for lurid, violent action,” his best were set in the Riverworld and World of the Tiers series. He was named a Grand Master of Science Fiction in 2001. To those who know and love him the best — the members of FarmerCon who first joined our convention in 2011 — Philip José Farmer is revered for his work concerning the Wold Newton Family.

To learn more about Philip José Farmer, please visit The Official Philip José Farmer Web Page. It’s the Brobdingnagian collection of all things Farmerian! And join us at PulpFest 2016/FarmerCon XI from Thursday evening, July 21, through Sunday afternoon, July 24, in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center for “Collaborating with Philip José Farmer.” Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2016/FarmerCon XI.

(DAYWORLD: A HOLE IN WEDNESDAY is a prequel to Philip José Farmer’s Dayworld trilogy about an overcrowded future that cures the problem by “stoning” six-sevenths of the population each day. Set between the events of the classic short story, “The Sliced-Crosswise Only-On-Tuesday World,” and the three Dayworld novels, the Farmer/Danny Adams collaboration — with cover art by Keith Howell — will debut at  PulpFest 2016/FarmerCon XI.)

 

Traveling through Time with H. G. Wells

Jun 6, 2016 by

Amazing Stories 27-08Just a few days ago, we discussed The Whisperer and The Skipper, two of the “superheroes” of the pulps. Both characters premiered in their own magazines in 1936, eighty years ago. PulpFest will be celebrating a potpourri of anniversaries in 2016, including the 120th anniversary of the first pulp magazine — THE ARGOSY — and the 90th anniversary of the debut of the first continuing science fiction magazine, AMAZING STORIES. We’ll be previewing our programming during this month.

September 21, 2016 marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of H. G. Wells. Along with Jules Verne (1828-1905), Wells is a central pillar to what we today call science fiction. However, Wells was also a multifaceted personality and talent. Educated in the sciences and a literary genius, Herbert George Wells came into prominence during the late nineteenth century. By the turn of the century, he was considered by many to be the world’s most important social thinker.

A prodigious talent, Wells wrote for the popular fiction magazines of his native England during “The Age of the Storytellers,” a period when increasingly urban and literate societies required cheap, entertaining, and easily accessible entertainment to escape the drudgery of the mills and offices. Writing for magazines such as THE STRAND and PEARSON’S MAGAZINE, H. G. Wells delivered countless scientific romances that are enjoyed to this very day. His classic novels “The War of the Worlds” and “The Invisible Man,” were both originally published in PEARSON’S in 1897. His later science fiction, including “The First Men in the Moon” (1900-1901) and “The Country of the Blind” (1904), would run inTHE STRAND.

It would be difficult to deny the importance of Wells to the development of both science fiction and AMAZING STORIES. During his three years as editor and publisher of the first science-fiction magazine, Hugo Gernsback turned to Wells’ fictional output for nearly thirty stories, reprinting such tales as “The Country of the Blind,” “The Crystal Egg,” “The Empire of the Ants,” “The First Men in the Moon,” “The Invisible Man,” “The Island of Dr. Moreau,” “The Man Who Could Work Miracles,” “A Story of the Days to Come,” “The Time Machine,” “The Valley of the Spiders,” “The War of the Worlds,” and “When the Sleeper Wakes” in his flagship title and its companions.

War of the Worlds

At 10:05 PM on Thursday, July 21 — the opening night of PulpFest 2016 — please join us in the Union Rooms on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency in downtown Columbus, Ohio for “Traveling through Time with H. G. Wells.” Professor Garyn G. Roberts will offer an illustrated presentation regarding Wells that surveys both the better and lesser-known achievements in the man’s life, emphasizing and including his works reprinted in Gernsback’s AMAZING STORIES. Garyn will also explore the author’s many contributions to the early days of pulp magazine speculative fiction.

Garyn Roberts has written extensively about the pulps, both professionally and as a fan, and has edited or co-edited some of the best collections of fiction from the pulps. He is the author/editor of the award-winning THE PRENTICE HALL ANTHOLOGY OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASYGaryn was presented with the Munsey Award by PulpFest in 2013 to honor his many contributions to the pulp community.

The summertime destination for fans and collectors of vintage popular fiction and related materials, PulpFest seeks to honor pulp fiction by drawing attention to the many ways it had inspired writers, artists, film directors, software developers, and other creators over the decades. The convention will take place from Thursday evening, July 21st, through Sunday afternoon, July 24th, in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2016.

Wells War of the Worlds film poster

(Three visions of H. G. Wells’ “The War of the Worlds.” Frank R. Paul, the “grandfather of science-fiction art,” painted the cover for the August 1927 issue of AMAZING STORIES, illustrating the first half of the classic novel, serialized by the magazine in two parts. PulpFest 2016 has used Paul’s cover art throughout the past year to promote our convention at book stores, comic shops, and other conventions and fairs.

“War of the Worlds” was originally serialized in eight parts in PEARSON’S MAGAZINE, running from April through December in the year 1897. It was very well-illustrated by Warwick Goble.

In 1951, film producer George Pal, screenwriter Barré Lyndon, and director Byron Haskin began working to produce a movie that above all, would attempt to portray as realistically as possible the details of an alien invasion. Largely set in the United States and starring Gene Barry and Ann Robinson, Pal’s THE WAR OF THE WORLDS was released in 1953. Although the film now appears somewhat dated, it remains one of the best and most important science fiction movies of the 1950s. Unfortunately, the creator of the film art is not known.)

Street & Smith’s Second String Superheroes

Jun 1, 2016 by

The Whisperer 1936-10Will Murray discovered Doc Savage in 1969 when he picked up the Bantam Books edition of DUST OF DEATH. Within a few short years, he began contributing to Doc Savage fanzines, starting with THE DOC SAVAGE READERSoon thereafter, he began placing articles in other fanzines, including ECHOES, THE PULP COLLECTOR, and PULP VAULT, writing about Doc and other pulp characters and the magazines in which they appeared. Today, nearly fifty years later, Will is one of the most respected authorities on the pulp magazine, having authored countless articles and books, including THE DUENDE HISTORY OF THE SHADOW MAGAZINE and WORDSLINGERS: AN EPITAPH FOR THE WESTERN.

In addition to his many non-fiction work on the pulps, Murray was the ghost-writer for about forty of the Destroyer action-adventures novels. He has also written nineteen Doc Savage novels and a fully authorized Tarzan novel, RETURN TO PAL-UL-DON. A second is forthcoming. He also serves as the literary agent for the Lester Dent estate and as the co-editor of Sanctum Books’ highly regarded pulp reprints.

At 9:10 PM on Thursday evening, July 21, Will Murray will begin PulpFest‘s much-admired programming with a discussion of “Street & Smith’s Second String Superheroes — The Whisperer and The Skipper.”

After Street & Smith kicked off the hero-pulp explosion when THE SHADOW MAGAZINE debuted in 1931, pulp publishers scrambled to grab a share of that eager reading audience. More character pulps came into the mix in 1933: Street & Smith’s DOC SAVAGE, NICK CARTER MAGAZINE, and PETE RICE MAGAZINE; Thrilling Publications’ THE PHANTOM DETECTIVE and THE LONE EAGLE; and Popular’s THE SPIDER and G-8 AND HIS BATTLE ACES.

In 1936, Street & Smith decided to introduce a harder edge to their hero pulps. Turning to former newspaperman, Hollywood scripter, and prolific pulp author Laurence Donovan — who had written nine adventures of the Man of Bronze — the publisher brought out THE WHISPERER during the fall of 1936. Hitting the newsstands with an October 1936 number, The Whisperer was police Inspector (later police commissioner) James “Wildcat” Gordon. The stocky, granite-jawed policeman attempted to fight crime within the law during the day, but transformed into The Whisperer to take the law into his own hands when it didn’t go far enough. THE WHISPERER lasted 14 issues, ending with the December 1937 number. All of the novels were written by Donovan under the house name Clifford Goodrich.

Two months after the first appearance of the original THE WHISPERER magazine, THE SKIPPER went on sale with a December 1936 cover date. As The Whisperer is often said to have been inspired by The Shadow, there’s little doubt that Captain John Fury — the Skipper — was a variant of Doc Savage.

The Skipper 1936-12Also written by Laurence Donovan — under the house name Wallace Brooker — Cap Fury wasn’t the giant that Doc was; instead he, like Wildcat Gordon, was stocky, but with “flaming red hair” and “sharp arctic blue” eyes. He had Doc-like skills, which included lip reading, using pressure points to subdue the bad guys, and cat-like agility. He also relied on oversized sea boots to conceal hypodermics, oxygen masks, and other gadgets. His flaming red hair and last name echoed his dealings with the criminal sort. Unlike Doc, who refrained from killing, Cap Fury made good use of automatic pistols and a whip to mete out justice. Vowing to rid the seas of pirates and criminals, he battled a number of fantastic foes who controlled death rays, a meteorite that removed oxygen from the air, voodoo practitioners, plague-bearing rats, and other nefarious foes.

When THE SKIPPER was canceled after 12 issues with the December 1937 number, Cap Fury moved into the back pages of DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE. The shorter stories were written by Donovan, Harold Davis, and Norman Daniels.

Join Will Murray at PulpFest 2016 to learn much more about The Whisperer and Cap Fury. “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” will salute the 80th anniversaries of the two pulp heroes. PulpFest 2016 will take place from July 21 through July 24 in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. You’ll have a FANTASTIC time. You can book a room from the PulpFest home page by clicking the link that reads “Book a Room Now.”

(THE WHISPERER was introduced to readers with its October 1936 number, featuring front cover art by the talented John Newton Howitt, a devoted landscape painter whose work was sold at fine art galleries in New York City. With the advent of the Great Depression, the artist turned to the pulps for income. An excellent painter, Howitt found a ready market in the rough-paper periodicals, selling freelance pulp covers to ADVENTURE, DIME DETECTIVE, HORROR STORIES, THE SPIDER, TERROR TALES, THE WHISPERER, WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE, and other pulp magazine titles.

THE SKIPPER, including the first issue dated December 1936, featured cover art by Lawrence Donner Toney, a graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago. During the 1930s and 1940s, Toney painted covers for pulp magazines, such as CLUES, COMPLETE STORIES, WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE, and WILD WEST WEEKLY, all published by Street & Smith.)

Pulps in the Pub

May 25, 2016 by

Western Story 31-12-26 2Why do we attend PulpFest? We’re able to find pulps and other collectibles across the Internet. So perhaps it seems foolish to travel hundreds or even thousands of miles to attend a convention dedicated to magazines that most people know nothing about.

But PulpFest is more than a dealers’ room featuring tens of thousands of pulp magazines, vintage paperbacks, digests, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, original art, first edition hardcovers, series books, reference books, dime novels and story papers, Big Little Books, B-Movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age comic books, as well as newspaper adventure strips. PulpFest is people — readers and collectors with a common interest in pulp fiction and pulp art. People who realize that the pulps had a profound effect on American popular culture.

Why do we attend PulpFest? According to collector Walker Martin: “They are a hell of a lot of fun! Not only do you get to roam around a gigantic dealer’s room full of books and pulps, but you get to meet and talk to some of the greatest collectors and dealers. These will lead to future deals and contacts. Plus you can eat and drink with these guys!”

After the end of our evening programming on Thursday, July 21, join PulpFest for a round or three in the bar at the Hyatt Regency Columbus. Buy a round for your table and talk about the magazines we love and collect. “What’s your favorite Doc Savage adventure? How many people died in ‘Death Reign of the Vampire King?’ Did Joan Randall have a thing for Gragg the Robot? Remember when Conan bit off that vulture’s head in ‘A Witch Shall Be Born?’ How the hell do you say Cthulhu? And what about Tsathoggua? Do you pronounce that with a lisp? Why does the Phantom Detective wear a top hat? Who the hell is Pinky Jenkins?”

These are just some of the mysteries you might clear up with your pals — old and new — at PulpFest 2016. You sure can’t do that on your iPhone!

(Come celebrate “Christmas in July” over the weekend of July 21 – 24 in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. Pick up a few pulps to put under your holiday tree during PulpFest 2016. And don’t forget to join us for “Pulps in the Pub.” Perhaps you’ll have as much fun as these three songsters, painted by John Falter for the December 26, 1931 issue of Street & Smith’s WESTERN STORY MAGAZINE.)

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Countdown to PulpFest

May 22, 2016 by

2016 Post CardIt’s just sixty days to PulpFest 2016! On Thursday, July 21, be one of hundreds of pop-culture fans who will be arriving at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Columbus, Ohio for the annual summertime get-together for fans of pulp art and fiction. Please visit our registration page to learn how to join the convention that has become summer’s pop culture center of the universe.

In the weeks ahead, we’ll be talking about our dealers, this year’s Munsey Award nominees, our PULPSTER program book, and much more. You can keep abreast of all these updates by bookmarking www.pulpfest.com and visiting often or by liking our Facebook page. So be sure to like PulpFest on Facebook and ask for our posts to be delivered to your personal Facebook page. You can also follow us on Twitter where we’ll be tweeting about our home page updates. We’ll also be posting to a variety of Yahoo newsgroups such as Pulpmags and Flearun. And watch for our “100 Covers in 100 Days” posts on Instagram and TumblrWe’ll be running one hundred AMAZING STORIES covers as part of our 2016 salute to the first continuing science fiction magazine.

PulpFest is known for its superb programming and the line-up that we’re planning for our 2016 convention is shaping up to be one of our best. PulpFest 2016 will be paying tribute to the history of the pulps by saluting the 150th anniversary of the birth of H. G. Wells; the 120th anniversary of the debut of the first pulp magazine, THE ARGOSY; the 100th anniversary of the genre pulps such as DETECTIVE STORY and LOVE STORY; the ninetieth anniversary of the creation of the first science fiction magazine, AMAZING STORIES; the 80th anniversaries of the premieres of two exciting hero pulpsTHE SKIPPER and THE WHISPERER; and the tenth anniversary of Sanctum Books, well known for their reprints of THE SHADOW, DOC SAVAGETHE SPIDER, and other hero pulps. Our Guest of Honor will be author, editor, and pulp fan Ted White, the man who ushered in the Golden Age of AMAZING STORIES and FANTASTIC during the 1970s and wrote the Captain America novel THE GREAT GOLD STEAL and many other books. We’ll have all this plus a dealers’ room featuring tens of thousands of pulp magazines, vintage paperbacks, digests, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, original art, first edition hardcovers, series books, reference books, dime novels and story papers, Big Little Books, B-Movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age comic books, as well as newspaper adventure strips.

So what are you waiting for? It’s time for you to register for PulpFest 2016! There’s no other way for you to be part of “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con.” While you’re at it, you can reserve a room at the Hyatt Regency Columbus by clicking one of the links on the PulpFest home page that reads “Book a Room Now.” You can also call 1-888-421-1442 to book a room by telephone. However, be sure to mention PulpFest 2016 to get the special convention rate. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ll help to ensure the convention’s success. Given its popularity, we urge every member to book a hotel room forPulpFest 2016 as soon as possible. The earlier you place your room reservation for this year’s PulpFest, the greater chance you have of landing a room.

Although the Hyatt is the ideal place to stay during the convention, we want everyone to be able to make it to the “pop culture center of the universe” and “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con. So if you’re not from the Columbus area, please book a room as soon as possible to be sure you have a place to stay for PulpFest 2016. With the programming line-up that we have and our great dealer’s room, we want everyone to have a chance to attend our convention. Rest assured, you’ll have a FANTASTIC time! We look forward to seeing you in Columbus from July 21 – 24 for PulpFest 2016.

Hyatt-Regency

Roll the Dice and Join PulpFest 2016

May 18, 2016 by

Fortune and Glory

PulpFest was founded on the premise that the pulps had a profound effect on American popular culture, reverberating through a wide variety of mediums — comic books, movies, paperbacks and genre fiction, television, men’s adventure magazines, radio drama, and even video and role-playing games. The summertime destination for fans and collectors of vintage popular fiction, art, and related materials, PulpFest seeks to honor the pulps by drawing attention to the many ways such magazines have inspired writers, artists, film directors, software developers, and other creators over the decades.

Last year, PulpFest introduced a gaming track. Many of the themes found in the world of modern games resonate from the pulps and the stories published in those magazines. There are games based on Conan, the Cthulhu Mythos, space operas such as Doc Smith’s Lensman series, westerns, mysteries and, of course, the pulp heroes. Role-playing games, or RPGs, are especially noted for quick action, cliff-hangers, and adventure.

It is quite appropriate that games will be returning to this summer’s pulp convention. Both TSR Hobbies — the original publisher of DUNGEONS & DRAGONS — and Wizards of the Coast — the company that popularized the collectible card game genre with MAGIC: THE GATHERING — served as the publisher of AMAZING STORIES. The first continuing science fiction magazine, its ninetieth anniversary will be feted at PulpFest 2016. The convention is working with several Columbus-based gaming groups and individuals to develop our gaming track. They will also manage our games for members who want to explore this aspect of the pulps.

The Columbus chapter of the Ohio Pathfinder Society will run RPGs dealing with weird tales, ancient ruins, and murder mysteries set in a fantasy world based on the Pathfinder RPG. Another Ohio group, Rogue Cthulhu, will be running role-playing adventures based on H. P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos and other weird tales set in the 1920s. This year, we’ll be adding the FELLOWSHIP OF THE WHITE STAR  game system, which utilizes a semi-historical setting of 1905 – 1914 Earth.  Join the Fellowship in their fight against the evils plots of Rasputin, Imhotep, Dracula, Baba Yaga, Emilio Aguinaldo, Arthur Evans, Jack the Ripper, and the Six-Fingered Hand.

The PulpFest gaming track will also feature board and card games that will be set up for people looking to find some new and interesting entertainment at the convention. FORTUNE AND GLORY is an exciting board game in which you are an adventurer crossing the world in search of lost artifacts, like many of the heroes of ARGOSY, another magazine that PulpFest 2016 will be saluting.  Additionally, we’ll have ELDRITCH HORROR, a board game featuring a band of investigators fighting the influence of Cthulhu around the globe, plus CTHULHU DICEELDER SIGN, and ZOMBIE DICE. Other board games loaded with cliffhangers, science fiction, aliens and mysteries will also be available at the convention. We’ll have games that can last from twenty minutes to several hours and are planning to have prizes available for our game-playing members, depending upon support from gaming companies.

The PulpFest 2016 gaming track will begin at 10 AM on Saturday, July 23, and last until 10 PM or thereabouts. All games will take place in the Clark Room, located on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency. There will be eight tables set up where a variety of board games, card games, and role-playing games will be presented. Watch for the PulpFest PLAY banner outside the entrance to our game room.

The only requirements to play games at PulpFest 2016 are a PulpFest membership, your imagination, and a desire to have a good time. So if you enjoy pulps and you enjoy games, PulpFest will be the place to be. You can join us at the beautiful Hyatt Regency in Columbus, Ohio, beginning on Thursday evening, July 21, and running through Sunday afternoon, July 24. Click the registration button below our home page banner to learn how to register for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con,” also known as, “Summer’s FANTASTIC Pulp Gaming Con.”

(FORTUNE AND GLORY, THE CLIFFHANGER GAME — designed by Jason C. Hill and published by Flying Frog Productions — is a fast-paced game of high adventure, vile villains, edge-of-your-seat danger, and cliffhanger pulp movie action. Players travel the globe in search of ancient artifacts, fending off danger and villains at every turn in a quest for ultimate reward. So strap on your adventure boots and goggles, fire up the engines on the seaplane, and grab some extra ammo for your revolver … the Nazis already have a head start and in this race for fortune and glory, there’s no prize for second place!)

We Hope that You’ve Enjoyed AMAZING STORIES

Mar 14, 2016 by

Amazing Stories 27-08Over the last month we’ve turned our website over to author, anthologist, and popular culture historian Mike Ashley, running his multi-part history AMAZING STORIES, originally offered in the January through July 1992 issues of TSR’s AMAZING® STORIES. Once again, we’d like to thank Curt Phillips, the moderator of the Yahoo newsgroup PulpMags, for drawing our attention to and providing us with copies of Mike’s exceptional series about the world’s first science fiction magazine.

You’re more than welcome to post your comments about Mike Ashley’s “The AMAZING Story” to our Facebook site at https://www.facebook.com/PulpFest.

Mr. Ashley’s article was a perfect tie-in to one of the major themes of PulpFest 2016, namely, the 90th anniversary of the first continuing science fiction magazine, Hugo Gernsback’s AMAZING STORIESIn addition to the appearance of our Guest of Honor, Ted White — the author and editor who ushered in the Golden Age of AMAZING STORIES and FANTASTIC during the 1970s and wrote the Captain America novel THE GREAT GOLD STEAL and many other books  — we’ll be offering a presentation on the magazine itself, put together by Joseph Coluccio, president of the Pittsburgh Area Fantasy and Science Fiction Club. Mr. Coluccio will discuss the pulp era of AMAZING, the years when Hugo Gernsback, T. O’Conor Sloane, Ray Palmer, William Hamling, and Howard Browne helmed the world’s first science fiction magazine. He’ll also be exploring the digest years of the magazine, when editors such as Cele Goldsmith and Ted White published countless amazing stories and brought the magazine into its golden age.

The 150th anniversary of H. G. Wells‘ birth — another theme of our convention — will likewise tie into our AMAZING story. Herbert George Wells, who came into prominence during the late nineteenth century, was educated in the sciences and was a literary genius. It would be difficult to deny the importance of Wells to the development of both science fiction and AMAZING STORIES. During his three years as editor and publisher of the first science fiction magazine, Gernsback turned to Wells’ fictional output for nearly thirty stories, reprinting such tales as “The Country of the Blind,” “The Crystal Egg,” “The Empire of the Ants,” “The First Men in the Moon,” “The Invisible Man,” “The Island of Dr. Moreau,” “The Man Who Could Work Miracles,” “A Story of the Days to Come,” “The Time Machine,” “The Valley of the Spiders,” “The War of the Worlds,” and “When the Sleeper Wakes” in his flagship title and its companions.

Our presentation, “Traveling through Time with H. G. Wells,” will feature Garyn G. Roberts, winner of the 2013 Munsey Award. Professor Roberts has written extensively about the pulps, both professionally and as a fan. His work, THE PRENTICE HALL ANTHOLOGY OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY, one of the leading college level textbooks on the subject, is notable for the attention paid to the pulp magazines.

These are just some of the ways that PulpFest 2016 will be celebrating ninety years of AMAZING STORIES. We certainly hope that you’re planning to join us from Thursday evening, July 21st, through Sunday afternoon, July 24th, in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center for “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con.” In addition to our presentations on AMAZING — scheduled for July 21st through the 23rd — PulpFest 2016 will also be paying tribute to the history of the pulps by saluting the 120th anniversary of the debut of the first pulp magazine, THE ARGOSY; the 100th anniversary of the genre pulps such as DETECTIVE STORY and LOVE STORY; the 80th anniversaries of the premieres of two exciting hero pulpsTHE SKIPPER and THE WHISPERER; and the tenth anniversary of Sanctum Books, well known for their reprints of DOC SAVAGETHE SHADOW,  and other hero pulps. You’ll find our planned programming schedule at http://www.pulpfest.com/2016/01/coming-soon-to-columbus-pulpfest-2016/.

In addition to a line-up of great programming, PulpFest 2016 will also have a dealers’ room featuring tens of thousands of pulp magazines, vintage paperbacks, digests, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, original art, first edition hardcovers, series books, reference books, dime novels and story papers, Big Little Books, B-Movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age comic books, as well as newspaper adventure strips. So what are you waiting for? Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2016.

(Frank R. Paul, the “grandfather of science-fiction art,” painted the cover for the August 1927 issue of AMAZING STORIES, illustrating the first half of the classic H. G. Wells novel, “The War of the Worlds,” serialized by the magazine in two parts. PulpFest 2016 is using Paul’s classic illustration in its promotional efforts for this summer’s convention which promises to be an AMAZING Pulp Con!)