2016 Auction Highlights

Jul 8, 2016 by

The OutsiderThe Saturday Night Auction returns to PulpFest on July 23. It will begin at 10 PM with the always entertaining John P. Gunnison of Adventure House serving as auctioneer.

Although PulpFest annually invests a great deal of time and energy to develop a top-notch programming schedule, it also prides itself for the effort it puts into its annual auction. Each year, the convention’s auction director, J. Barry Traylor, endeavors to put together a range of material to make for lively bidding. Our 2015 auction included the original typescript for the Philip José Farmer novel DAYWORLD, with notes and corrections in the author’s hand; a number of lots from the estate of Earl Kussman who, along with Ed Kessell and Nils Hardin, organized the first Pulpcon; lots of ARGOSY, ADVENTURE, STARTLING STORIES, and other pulps; the first issue of SINISTER STORIES; original artwork by Gahan Wilson and Jon Arfstrom; signed books, photos, and ephemera; fanzines; and much more.

One of the highlights that will be part of our PulpFest 2016 auction will be a number of early Arkham House books, including a very exceptional copy of H. P. Lovecraft’s THE OUTSIDER AND OTHERS. After examining the volume, one of the leading collectors and dealers of WEIRD TALES and Arkham House books stated that it was among the top ten percent of the book’s remaining copies. THE OUTSIDER AND OTHERS was the first book published by Arkham. Printed in an edition of 1268 copies, it has never been reprinted.

Other titles in the Arkham collection that will be offered during this year’s auction will be Lovecraft’s BEYOND THE WALL OF SLEEP, Robert E. Howard’s SKULL-FACE AND OTHERS, William Hope Hodgson’s THE HOUSE ON THE BORDERLAND, and Clark Ashton Smith’s LOST WORLDS. There’s also a copy of the Wandering Star edition of Howard’s THE SAVAGE TALES OF SOLOMON KANE, originally published in 1988. This copy also has original artwork by Gary Gianni, the book’s illustrator. Most of these books are in very desirable condition.

If you can’t make it to PulpFest 2016 and would like to bid on any of these highly collectible volumes, please contact PulpFest marketing and programming director Mike Chomko by email at mike@pulpfest.com.

Doc Savage Baumhofer RevisedIn addition to the Arkhams, we’ll have over two hundred pulps from the collection of Woody Hagadish. A longtime collector and reader of books and pulps, Woody a Pulpcon attendee in the past. Primarily interested in western pulps — particularly WILD WEST WEEKLY — Woody was a reading enthusiast and enjoyed his collection. We’ll be offering a variety of magazines from such diverse genres as sports pulps, general fiction magazines, romance pulps, hero pulps, air war stories, science fiction, westerns, and detective magazines. Also included are three portraits that served as premiums for readers of DOC SAVAGE and THE SHADOW MAGAZINE. The estate is hoping to find good homes for all of these collectibles, getting them to the people who would best appreciate them, as Woody Hagadish had done during his lifetime.

If all goes well with this year’s auction, PulpFest is hoping to offer more pulp magazines from the collection of Woody Hagadish during our 2017 confab. You’ll find some examples of the pulps and other collectibles from Woody’s collection (as well as the Arkham edition of SKULL-FACE AND OTHERS) at the bottom of this post.

There will also be lots submitted to the auction by registered members of the convention. Pulp magazines and related materials, vintage paperbacks, digests, men’s adventure and true crime magazines, original art, first edition hardcovers, series books, reference books, dime novels and story papers, Big Little Books, B-Movies, serials and related paper collectibles, old-time radio shows, and Golden and Silver Age comic books as well as newspaper adventure strips will all be allowed in the auction. Modern graphic novels and comic books will be allowed only if they are related to the pulps. Sexually explicit magazines such as PLAYBOY, PENTHOUSE, and OUI and soft-core porn will not be allowed. Any member of PulpFest 2016 can submit items to the auction. Your PulpFest badge number will be used as your auction bidder and/or seller number.

Start making your plans now to attend PulpFest 2016 to see some of the great material that Barry Traylor is assembling for this year’s auction. We hope to see you from Thursday evening, July 21, through Sunday afternoon, July 24, in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center for PulpFest 2016 — “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con!”

If you are not from the Columbus area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can try calling 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there are rooms still available. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor  or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Other sites include www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpcourtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, and the Experience Columbus lodging page at http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/stay Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(Released in 1939 by Arkham House, H. P. Lovecraft’s THE OUTSIDER AND OTHERS has never been reprinted. It features dust jacket art by the great pulp and fantasy artist, Virgil Finlay. He got his start as an artist during the Great Depression when he sent unsolicited illustrations to his favorite pulp magazine, WEIRD TALES. Even today, Finlay remains one of the most highly regarded artists in the fields of science fiction and fantasy.

Walter Baumhofer’s classic portrait of Doc Savage — originally used as the cover art to the July 1935 issue of DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE, featuring the novel “Quest of Qui”– served as a premium provided to readers of the pulp magazine. A print of Robert G. Harris’ painting for “The Sea Angel,” published in the November 1937 issue, was also used as a premium.

Over at THE SHADOW MAGAZINE, Street & Smith art director Bill Lawler — who was noted for his hawkish visage — posed for a black and white portrait dressed as Walter B. Gibson’s “Dark Avenger.” Readers would clip a number of coupons from issues of THE SHADOW or DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE and mail them in to receive these free giveaways.

Below is a small sampling of some of the pulps and other collectibles from the Woody Hagadish collection that will be up for bid at this year’s PulpFest auction. From the top: ACTION STORIES for June and December 1940; ARGOSY for June 1, 1935; BLUE BOOK for July 1938; the first issue of EXCITING BASEBALL, dated Spring 1949; DOC SAVAGE MAGAZINE pulp premium with art by Robert G. Harris; and THE SHADOW MAGAZINE pulp premium featuring Bill Lawler as The Shadow. At the bottom is SKULL-FACE AND OTHERS by Robert E. Howard, with dust jacket art by Hannes Bok. It was published by Arkham House in 1946 in an edition of 3,004 copies.)

Action Stories 40-06  Action Stories 40-12  Argosy 35-06-01 Blue Book July 1938 Exciting Baseball Spring 1949

Shadow Premium Revised

Doc Savage Harris Revised

Skull-Face

 

 

 

Cthulhu is Calling You to PulpFest’s Gaming Track

Jul 14, 2015 by

Call of Cthulhu Banner

During the late summer of 1926, H. P. Lovecraft wrote “The Call of Cthulhu.” Initially rejected by WEIRD TALES editor Farnsworth Wright, it was first published in “The Unique Magazine” in its February 1928 issue. Although a few related stories predated it — “The Nameless City,” “The Hound,” and “The Festival” — in what has come to be known as “The Cthulhu Mythos,” “The Call of Cthulhu” is a seminal work of its author. As writer and Lovecraft correspondent Fritz Leiber observed, “Here for the first time, Lovecraft moves horror from the realm of Earth to the stars.”

In Lovecraft’s remaining years following the publication of “The Call of Cthulhu,” he expanded on its themes in such tales as “The Whisperer in Darkness,” “At the Mountains of Madness,” and “The Shadow Out of Time,” depicting a universe of mind-numbing horror and reflecting his own materialistic atheism. During his last years, Lovecraft invited other writers to pen their own tales using the “synthetic folklore” he had created. “I think it is rather good fun to have this artificial mythology given an air of verisimilitude by wide citation.” Some of the authors who responded with their own “Cthulhu” fiction were Clark Ashton Smith, Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch, Frank Belknap Long, and Henry Kuttner.

In later years, particularly following the death of “the old gentleman,” August Derleth worked to expand Lovecraft’s so-called “mythos,” shaping it in a way that some scholars claim to be a corruption of the original author’s intent. Derleth’s “Cthulhu Mythos,” as the story-type came to be known, shifted away from Lovecraft’s nihilistic universe toward a more “good versus evil” theme. Other writers, notably Lin Carter and Brian Lumley, continued this process.

Although Derleth may have corrupted Lovecraft’s “synthetic folklore,” he also helped to popularize the author’s fiction through his Arkham House Publishers and significantly expanded Lovecraft’s reputation. His visions increasingly came under the microscope of academia and scholars. His fiction became increasingly known and popular, leading to adaptations in a variety of media. All of this came to a head in 1981 when a wargame and role-playing-game publisher known as Chaosium released the first edition of CALL OF CTHULHU, a game developed by Sandy Peterson. It is is now in its seventh edition and is one of the role-playing games that will be featured during PulpFest‘s new gaming track.

Based on H. P. Lovecraft’s observation that “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown,” the setting of Chaosium’s CALL OF CTHULHU is a darker and stranger version of our world, where the players try to hold back the darkness. The original game is set in the 1920s, the setting of many of Lovecraft’s stories. There have been numerous interesting adventures written for the game system over the years, including the CTHULHU BY GASLIGHT supplement, a blend of occult and Holmesian mystery set in Victorian England; CTHULHU DARK AGES that takes place about 1000 AD; CTHULHU RISING and its 23rd century setting; and CTHULHU INVICTUS, which takes place in the first century at the time of the Roman Empire.

Whatever the setting, the players take on the roles of detectives, criminals, scholars, artists, war veterans, and others who are drawn into the realm of the mysterious. Often, events begin innocently enough, until more and more of the true nature of reality is revealed. As the players experience more of the true horrors of the world and the irrelevance of humanity, their sanity inevitably withers away. The fun of these games comes from assuming roles that are different from everyday life and sometimes, making choices that one would not make in reality.

CALL OF CTHULHU has a reputation as a game in which it is quite common for a player character to die in gruesome circumstances or end up in a mental institution. Eventual triumph of the players is not a guarantee. However, dying heroically or going insane is part of the fun of this game. But who knows? You may gain the tools you need to defeat the creatures of the night – mystical knowledge and magic – and outsmart your opponents. As H. P. Lovecraft wrote in 1926, “The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents.”

The PulpFest 2015 gaming track will begin at 10 AM on both Friday and Saturday and last until 10 PM or thereabouts. On Sunday, games will begin at 10 AM and continue until the end of the convention. All games will be set up in the Clark Room, located on the second floor of the Hyatt Regency. The only requirements to play games at PulpFest 2015 are a PulpFest membership, your imagination, and a desire to have a good time. So if you enjoy pulps and you enjoy games, PulpFest will be the place to be. You can join us at the beautiful Hyatt Regency in Columbus, Ohio, beginning on Thursday evening, August 13th and running through Sunday afternoon, August 16th. To book a room for this year’s convention, please visit www.pulpfest.com/2015/06/16872/. Then, click the red “register” button on our home page to learn how to register for “Summer’s Great Pulp Con,” and now, “Summer’s Great Pulp Gaming Con.”

(Many thanks to Chaosium, the publisher of CALL OF CTHULHU, one of the most recognized role playing games in the world. Chaosium has donated a selection of books and role-playing-game supplements to be used as prizes for PulpFest‘s new gaming track.)

Pulp Macabre — The Art of Lee Brown Coye

Jul 11, 2015 by

Weird Tales 45-07Back around the beginning of May, Feral House, a small press with a taste for the outrageous, approached PulpFest with an offer that was very difficult to refuse. Author and collector Mike Hunchback had put together a definitive survey of the later work of illustrator Lee Brown Coye and was interested in presenting a slide show of the artist’s work at this year’s PulpFest. Given that our convention was celebrating the 125th anniversary of the birth of author H. P. Lovecraft, we jumped at the chance to have Mike be part of our 2015 conference. After all, Coye, like Lovecraft, was very strongly associated with “The Unique Magazine, “ WEIRD TALES.

Born in Syracuse, New York in 1907, Lee Brown Coye became very interested in drawing as a teenager and began studying art books on his own. In the late twenties, he was introduced to the technique of scratch-board drawing by woodcut illustrator Howard McCormick. This became the artist’s favored medium.

Coye made his first pulp magazine appearance in the July 1930 issue of GOLDEN BOOK.  However, it was not until the middle forties — after illustrating August Derleth’s SLEEP NO MORE, an anthology of horror and ghost stories for Farrar & Rhinehart — that his work began to appear regularly in the rough-paper market. He was soon illustrating stories and painting covers for pulp magazines such as SHORT STORIES and WEIRD TALES. His work for the latter proved very popular and he became a prolific contributor, sometimes appearing four or five times in a single issue. His drawings for the magazine included a running series of illustrations called “Weirdisms.” Coye pragmatically believed that, “I’d rather have my stuff in pulp magazines where people can see it than in a museum where they don’t.”

Writing in THE WEIRD TALES STORY, Robert Weinberg opined, “There was never an artist who came close to capturing horror and dread like Lee Brown Coye. He was master of the weird and grotesque illustration. Coye’s sketches had the shape of nightmares.”

More Derleth anthologies featuring Coye illustrations followed in the late forties — WHO KNOCKS? and THE NIGHT SIDE. The artist’s work continued to appear in WEIRD TALES until 1952. Beginning in 1962, following a ten-year hiatus from fantasy illustrating, Coye began producing horror and fantasy dust jackets for August Derleth’s Arkham House books. During this same period, his illustrations could be found in AMAZING STORIES, FANTASTIC STORIES OF IMAGINATION, and THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION. In later years, he illustrated books and periodicals from other independent publishers including several for Carcosa, a small press founded by Jim Groce, David Drake, and Karl Edward Wagner. According to the latter, Lee Brown Coye was “enormously talented and possessing the unsettling combination of a certain morbid genius with a whimsical sense of humor.” In the late seventies, Coye twice won the “World Fantasy Award for Best Artist.” He suffered a stroke, which left him partially paralyzed, in 1979 and died in September 1981, at the age of seventy-four.

Pulp MacabreNow, thanks to editors Mike Hunchback and Caleb Braaten, some of Coye’s weirdest and most passionately ghoulish artwork is once again being made available. PULP MACABRE, co-published in 2015 by Feral House and Sacred Bones Records, an alternative record company and publisher from Brooklyn, New York, showcases the art of Lee Brown Coye’s final and darkest era, a period when he was “king of the weird artists,” producing some of his strongest and most fearless work.

On Saturday afternoon, August 15th, at 2:30 PM, Mike Hunchback will discuss Coye’s life and work and share selected images from PULP MACABRE as well as fanzine covers, dust jackets, and photographs from his own collection that were not included in the book. Please be sure to visit www.pulpfest.com/pulpfest-2015-registration-information/ to learn how to register for this great convention and be part of PulpFest‘s salute to H. P. Lovecraft, WEIRD TALES, and the art of Lee Brown Coye.

(Not long after the appearance of the August Derleth anthology SLEEP NO MORE, the book’s illustrator, Lee Brown Coye, began a long relationship with WEIRD TALES. The first of his ten covers for the magazine appeared on its July 1945 number. He also produced many interior illustrations for the magazine, including a series of pen-and-ink drawings that the artist “called “Weirdisms.” His work continued to appear in WEIRD TALES until 1952.

After growing up on a steady diet of horror and fantasy fiction from Arkham House Publishers and old pulp magazines, people such as Jim Groce, David Drake, and Karl Edward Wagner started their own small presses during the 1970s. Another was Stuart David Schiff who, in 1973, began to publish WHISPERS, a magazine that “embraced classic horror pulp fiction as well as then-current Horror Culture. Under Schiff’s editorship, the poetry, short stories, essays, and various forms of artwork featured in the zine often reveled in the type of weird extremes found only in the grisliest pulps. Within just a few issues, WHISPERS elevated the quality of fiction found in fanzines, and other publishers would have to follow suit.

The third issue of Schiff’s magazine was dedicated entirely to Lee Brown Coye. In Schiff’s featured essay from the issue, he wrote: “Lee’s pen conjures up spheres beyond normal perception and brings them to you with both subtlety and gut-wrenching directness.” Lee Brown Coye’s cover art for the issue — dated March 1974 — also serves as the cover art for Mike Hunchback’s and Caleb Braaten’s PULP MACABRE compilation.”)

The Call of Cthulhu and the Lovecraft Mythos

Jul 6, 2015 by

Tales of the Cthulhu MythosDuring the late summer of 1926, H. P. Lovecraft wrote “The Call of Cthulhu.” Initially rejected by WEIRD TALES editor Farnsworth Wright, it was first published in “The Unique Magazine” in its February 1928 issue. Although three related stories predated it — “The Nameless City,” “The Hound,” and “The Festival” — in what has come to be known as “The Cthulhu Mythos,” “The Call of Cthulhu” is a seminal work of its author. As writer and Lovecraft correspondent Fritz Leiber observed, “Here for the first time, Lovecraft moves horror from the realm of Earth to the stars.”

In the years remaining to Lovecraft following the publication of “The Call of Cthulhu,” he expanded on its themes in such tales as “The Whisperer in Darkness,” “At the Mountains of Madness,” and “The Shadow Out of Time,” depicting a universe of mind-numbing horror that was a reflection of his own materialistic atheism. During this period, Lovecraft invited other writers to pen their own tales using the “synthetic folklore” he had created. “I think it is rather good fun to have this artificial mythology given an air of verisimilitude by wide citation.” Some of the authors who responded with their own “Cthulhu” fiction were Clark Ashton Smith, Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch, Frank Belknap Long, Henry Kuttner, and August Derleth.

“All of our gang frequently allude to the pet daemons of the others — thus Smith uses my Yog-Sothoth, while I use his Tsathoggua. Also, I sometimes insert a devil or two of my own in the tales I revise or ghost-write for professional clients. Thus our black pantheon acquires an extensive publicity & pseudo-authoritativeness it would not otherwise get.”

In later years, particularly following the death of “the old gentleman,” August Derleth worked to expand Lovecraft’s so-called “mythos,” albeit shaping it in a way that some scholars claim to be a corruption of the original author’s intent. Derleth’s “Cthulhu Mythos,” as the story-type came to be known, shifted away from Lovecraft’s nihilistic universe toward a more “good versus evil” backdrop. Other writers, notably Lin Carter and Brian Lumley, continued this process, basing their work on what Lovecraftian scholars have labeled, “the black magic quote,” purportedly written by Lovecraft:

“All my stories, unconnected as they may be, are based on one fundamental lor or legend: that this world was inhabited an one time by another race, who in practicing black magic, lost their foothold and were expelled, yet live on outside, ever ready to take possession of this earth again.”

Although Derleth may have corrupted Lovecraft’s “synthetic folklore,” twisting it away from its author’s intent, he also helped to popularize Lovecraft’s fiction through his Arkham House Publishers, significantly expanding Lovecraft’s reputation. The New Englander’s visions increasingly came under the microscope of academia and amateur scholars. His fiction became more widely read and popular, leading to adaptations in a variety of media including motion pictures, television, comic books, role-playing and video games, and even action figures and other toys. His stories are known the world over and though he lived much of his life in poverty, Lovecraft’s words and ideas have been transformed into a multi-million-dollar industry.

Call of Cthulhu One-SheetAs part of its celebration of the 125th anniversary of the birth of H. P. Lovecraft, PulpFest 2015 is proud to welcome John D. Haefele, author of A LOOK BEHIND THE DERLETH MYTHOSa critically acclaimed account of the birth of the Cthulhu Mythos; Don Herron, editor of the scholarly landmark, THE DARK BARBARIAN, and winner of the 2006 Black Circle Award for lifetime achievement in Robert E. Howard studies; popular culture scholar Rick Lai, who regularly appears as a panelist on podcasts produced by THE LOVECRAFT eZINE; Professor Tom Krabacher of California State University, Sacramento and a member of the Pulp Era Amateur Press Association; and Nathan Vernon Madison, a researcher involved in The Pulp Magazines Project and author of the Eisner-nominated ANTI-FOREIGN IMAGERY IN AMERICAN PULPS AND COMICS for a presentation entitled “The Call of Cthulhu: The Development of Lovecraft’s Mythos.” Scheduled for Friday evening, August 14th, at 9:50 PM, our panelists are promising a lively discussion that will explore the inspirations and origins of the Cthulhu Mythos as opposed to the Lovecraft’s Mythos and the Mythos of his contemporaries, as well as the controversies and personalities involved with these ideas over the years.

Join PulpFest 2015 at the beautiful Hyatt Regency in downtown Columbus, Ohio, beginning on Thursday, August 13th and running through Sunday, August 16th, for a salute to H. P. Lovecraft and WEIRD TALES, just a few short days before the author’s 125th birthday. Although our host hotel is completely booked, there are still some rooms available at nearby hotels. Please click here and you’ll find a link to a list of hotels to choose from. If you are not from the Columbus area and want to attend PulpFest 2015, we urge you to book your room now and not later. Rooms that are relatively close to PulpFest are disappearing fast during the time frame of our convention.

(The first edition of TALES OF THE CTHULHU MYTHOS is credited to “H. P. Lovecraft and Others.” Edited and with an Introduction by August Derleth, it was released in 1969 by Arkham House Publishers in an edition of 4024 copies. The jacket art was created by the incomparable Lee Brown Coye who twice won the “World Fantasy Award for Best Artist.” Coye and his artwork will be the subject of a presentation at PulpFest 2015 on Saturday afternoon, August 15th, beginning at 2:30 PM.

As Lovecraft’s fiction became more widely read and popular, it led to adaptations in a variety of media including motion pictures, television, comic books, role-playing and video games, and even action figures and other toys. It was left to an organization devoted to the live-action role-playing game CTHULHU LIVES, to create one of the most faithful film adaptations of the work of H. P. Lovecraft. In 2005, the H. P. Lovecraft Historical Society released THE CALL OF CTHULHU, a silent movie based on Lovecraft’s 1928 story. PulpFest will be offering a fully authorized showing of this film on Friday, August 14th, beginning at 11:30 PM. It will be accompanied by “Cool Air,” an episode from ROD SERLING’S NIGHT GALLERY that originally aired in 1971. Learn more by reading “The Films of H. P. Lovecraft.”

Please be sure to visit www.pulpfest.com/pulpfest-2015-registration-information/ to learn how to register for “Summer’s Great Pulp Con” and be part of our salute to H. P. Lovecraft, WEIRD TALES, and the art of Lee Brown Coye.)

The Weird Tales of Philip José Farmer

Jul 2, 2015 by

F&SF 79-05To most pulp enthusiasts, the late Philip José Farmer is best known as “A prolific and popular science fiction writer who shocked readers in the 1950s by depicting sex with aliens and challenged conventional pieties of the genre with caustic fables set on bizarre worlds of his own devising.” In science-fiction circles, Farmer is most remembered for his novels. Called “sprawling, episodic works that gave him room to explore the nuances of a provocative premise while indulging his taste for lurid, violent action,” his best were set in the Riverworld and World of the Tiers series. He was named a Grand Master of Science Fiction in 2001. To those who know and love him the best — the members of FarmerCon who first joined our convention in 2011 — Philip José Farmer is revered for his work concerning the Wold Newton Family. But what about Philip José Farmer, the horror writer? In this year when PulpFest celebrates the 125th anniversary of the birth of H. P. Lovecraft, it seems fitting that our FarmerCon friends turn their attention to Philip José Farmer, the writer of weird tales.

Farmer’s short story “The Freshman,” originally published in the May 1979 issue of THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, is certainly the story that owes the most to Lovecraft. Set at the New Englander’s fabled Miskatonic University in Arkham, Massachusetts, it concerns a sixty-year-old occult novelist who enrolls at the university. Soon thereafter, he is invited to pledge at a fraternity called the House of Hastur. A fairly playful horror story, it was selected for the 1990 edition of Arkham House‘s TALES OF THE CTHULHU MYTHOS.

Image of the BeastOther notable Farmer weird tales include such short stories as “Duo Miaule,” “Evil Be My Good,” “It’s the Queen of Darkness, Pal,” “Monolog,” “Nobody’s Perfect,” “Opening the Door,” “The Rise Gotten,” and “Wolf, Iron and Moth.” There are also the science-fiction/horror novels IMAGE OF THE BEAST and its sequel BLOWN. These concern a private detective who is led into a waking nightmare of sexual brutality and supernatural bestiality in a universe populated by erogenous vampires, werewolves and other polymorphic creatures from the darkest recesses of the human imagination. Additionally, the collaborative novel THE EVIL IN PEMBERLEY HOUSE  — written with Win Scott Eckert — is not only an addition to the Wold Newton cycle, but plays with pulp and Gothic horror traditions. Finally, there are elements of Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos to be found in his renowned classic DOC SAVAGE: HIS APOCALYPTIC LIFE and “The Monster on Hold,” the first chapter of an unfinished Doc Caliban novel that originally appeared in the World Fantasy Convention program book for 1983. Win Scott Eckert has entered into an agreement with the Estate of Philip José Farmer to complete this novel.

Help PulpFest and FarmerCon celebrate H. P. Lovecraft’s lasting influence, less than a week before the 125th anniversary of his birth, by attending “The Weird Tales of Philip José Farmer” on Friday evening, August 14th, at 9:10 PM. Featuring Jason Scott Aiken, Chuck Loridans, and Frank Schildiner, all leading scholars of popular culture and Farmerphilia, our FarmerCon X panel will take place in the second-floor programming area of “Summer’s Great Pulp Con” at the Hyatt-Regency Columbus.

Jason Scott Aiken  is a fantasy and horror writer and is also the host of Pulp Crazy, a blog and podcast dedicated to classic popular literature, characters, and themes. He has many episodes devoted to the works of Philip José Farmer and weird fiction from the pulp era. Chuck Loridans is one of the founding members of the New Wold Newton Meteoritics Society with whom he has appeared on panels at San Diego Comic-Con and ArchCon in St. Louis. His essay “The Daughters of Greystoke” appeared in MYTHS FOR THE MODERN AGE: PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER’S WOLD NEWTON UNIVERSE, published by MonkeyBrain Books. He teaches cartooning at the Renzi Education and Art Center in Shreveport, Louisiana and serves as the art director for the Gaslight Players theatre group. Frank Schildiner is a “new pulp” author who has also published several articles on horror in comic books, television, and film including essays on HELLBOY, the Frankenstein films, DARK SHADOWS, and television’s Lovecraftian links. His latest novel, THE QUEST OF FRANKENSTEIN, has Frankenstein’s monster meet H. P. Lovecraft’s Herbert West: Reanimator.

Chuck Loridans, it all started with Tarzan of the Apes, then Doc Savage. At the age of twelve he discovered Philip Jose’ Farmer had connected them. Farmer lead him to the incredible world of Pulp Heroes and the Wold Newton Universe. He is one of the founding Members of the NEW WOLD NEWTON METEORITICS SOCIETY with whom he has appeared in panels at Archon/Tuckercon/NASFIC in St. Louis and San Diego Comic-Con, promoting Wold Newton. He is the creator of MONSTAAH (Maximum Observation and/or Neutralization of Supernatural Terrors, Autonomous Agents Headquarters) and the Wold Newton Scholar who discovered that Tarzan of the Apes had two daughters (MYTHS FOR THE MODERN AGE: PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER’S WOLD NEWTON UNIVERSE, edited by Win Scott Eckert). Chuck makes his living in the real world as a hospital groundskeeper and a cartooning teacher at the Renzi Education and Art Center in Shreveport, LA. He is also the art director for the Gaslight Players theatre group.

Since 2011, PulpFest has hosted FarmerCon, a convention that began in Peoria, Illinois, the hometown of Philip José Farmer. Originally a gathering of Farmer fans figuratively, and literally, right outside Phil’s back door, FarmerCon offered presentations, dinners, and even picnics at the author’s house.  After the passing of Phil and Bette Farmer in 2009, it was decided to take FarmerCon on the road to broaden its horizons. By holding the convention alongside events such as PulpFest, Farmer fans get a variety of programming and a room full of pulp and book dealers to enjoy. As always, PulpFest is  very pleased to welcome its FarmerCon members to our joint conference.

To learn more about Philip José Farmer, please visit The Official Philip José Farmer Web Page. It’s the Brobdingnagian collection of all things Farmerian!

(Farmer’s “The Freshman” was originally published in the May 1979 issue of THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, featuring cover art by British artist David A. Hardy.

As a teenager, Hardy discovered Chesley Bonestell’s pioneering astronomical art and worked to emulate the “Father of Modern Space Art.” He got his big break when Patrick Moore, the host of the BBC’s THE SKY AT NIGHT, asked him to illustrate his next book. So began a lengthy collaboration between the two men. During the 1960s, Hardy became a freelance artist. He began to contribute cover art to science fiction magazines in early 1970. One year later, he started a long association with FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, creating more than fifty covers and many interior illustrations. He also painted numerous covers for both ANALOG and INTERZONE.

Farmer’s IMAGE OF THE BEAST was originally published in 1968 by Essex House, a Los Angeles publishing imprint that specialized in highbrow erotica. About half of their forty-two titles were science fiction or fantasy, including novels by Philip José Farmer, Richard E Geis, David Meltzer, and others. In 1979, Playboy Press reissued IMAGE OF THE BEAST, pairing it with its sequel, BLOWN. The cover art was by Enrich Torres, a painter best known for his work on the various Warren magazines, most prominently VAMPIRELLA, for which he rendered many covers.)