Free Stuff at PulpFest 2017

Jul 4, 2017 by

Bring on the fireworks! It’s time to celebrate our nation’s freedom. What better time for PulpFest 2017 to offer thanks for all of the donations we’ve received? They’re all meant for our members who will receive them free of charge. The only requirement is to attend “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry from July 27 through July 30!

Caliban Book Shop, located at 410 South Craig Street in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh, is offering a 10% discount to PulpFest members off any purchase from their shop. All you have to do is show your PulpFest badge to receive the discount. Caliban Book Shop features quality used and rare books as well as indie books and ‘zines by local authors. The store is located about 30 minutes from the DoubleTree. This offer is good from Thursday, July 27 through Sunday July 30. Click here for directions.

John L. Coker, III — President of First Fandom and Editor/Publisher of SCIENTIFICTION — THE FIRST FANDOM REPORT — has donated a number of signed, pulp-related trading cards that will be given away during the convention to six lucky badge holders.

Gordon Van Gelder and FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, the award-winning magazine that is celebrating its 68th anniversary in 2017, will again be offering copies of back issues to our members. Gordon’s magazine has been supporting PulpFest — and Pulpcon before it — for many years. We’re extremely grateful for the long-standing support of F&SF.

We’d also like to offer many thanks to Chaosium Inc., the publisher of CALL OF CTHULHU role playing game. Chaosium has donated a selection of fiction books and game supplements to be used as door prizes during PulpFest 2017.

Larque Press, the publisher of THE DIGEST ENTHUSIASThas donated a run of the first six issues of their exceptional magazine. All six issues — valued at over $50 — will be offered as a single lot during the Saturday night auction. All proceeds from the winning bid will go to PulpFest.

Wyatt Doyle and Bob Deis of New Texture have donated a great book mark to give away to PulpFest members. Please check out their MensPulpMags.com to learn more about New Texture’s The Men’s Adventure Library.

PulpFest sponsor, AbeBooks.com, as well as Meteor House and FarmerCon will be helping to sponsor our con suite. Our host hotel will be providing a room for our members where they can socialize after a hearty day of collecting in our dealers’ room and partaking in our evening programming. You’ll be able to enjoy drinks and snacks with your comrades in collecting and talk about the things that you love and collect. If you’d like to volunteer to serve as a host or hostess in the PulpFest con suite or are a dealer, publisher, or other organization that would like to sponsor the con suite for a night, please write to Jack Cullers at jack@pulpfest.com.

We’d also like to thank the many bookstores and comic shops throughout the Pittsburgh area, as well as the many book fairs and conventions throughout the United States that have helped to promote “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” all through the past year. You’ve done a FANTASTIC job and we couldn’t have done it without you! Special thanks to Joe Coluccio, president of Parsec, and Harold Forman for spreading our promotional material throughout the Pittsburgh area. We also want to thank Martin Grams, Tommy Hancock, Nathan Madison, and Rick Thomas for their help promoting us at various conventions.

If you are not from the Pittsburgh area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, tomorrow is the last day to receive the special convention rate. You can book your room directly through the PulpFest website. Below our banner and along the right hand side of our home page at pulpfest.com, you’ll find links that read “Book a Room.” Click on one of these links and you’ll be redirected to a secure site where you can book a room at the DoubleTree. You can also reserve a room by calling 1-800-222-8733. Please be sure to mention PulpFest in order to receive the special rate. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the DoubleTree, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

(During June 1942, six months after the United States entered World War II, magazines nationwide featured the American flag on their covers. Adopting the slogan “United We Stand,” some five hundred publications waved the stars and stripes to promote national unity, rally support for the war, and celebrate Independence Day.

For magazine publishers, displaying the flag was a way to prove their loyalty and value to the war effort. For the U.S. government, the campaign was an opportunity to sell bonds and boost morale. The magazines brought home a message of patriotism and ideals worth fighting for.)

Free Stuff at PulpFest!

Jul 4, 2016 by

Amazing Stories 43-08Bring on the fireworks! It’s time to celebrate our nation’s freedom. What better time for PulpFest 2016 to offer thanks for all of the donations we’ve received? They’re all meant for our members who will receive them free of charge. Their only requirement is to attend “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” at the Hyatt Regency in the heart of downtown Columbus, Ohio from July 21 through July 24!

Our newest sponsor, AbeBooks.com, will be offering two hardcover copies of popular culture expert Mike Ashley’s SCIENCE-FICTION REBELS — the fourth volume in the author’s HISTORY OF THE SCIENCE-FICTION MAGAZINE — as door prizes during July’s convention. PulpFest will be randomly selecting two members present at this year’s convention to receive hardbound copies of this new work of science fiction scholarship. It’s a great book — valued at over $100 — to offer at this year’s convention. After all, we’ll be saluting the 90th anniversary of the first continuing science fiction magazine, AMAZING STORIES, at this year’s PulpFest.

We’d also like to offer many thanks to Chaosium, the publisher of CALL OF CTHULHU, one of the most recognized role playing games in the world. Chaosium has donated a selection of both fiction books for door prizes and role playing game supplements to be used as prizes during PulpFest‘s gaming track.

Engle Publishing will be providing copies of THE PAPER & ADVERTISING COLLECTORS’ MARKETPLACE for distribution free of charge at PulpFest. They’ve been doing so since the first PulpFest in 2009.

Gordon Van Gelder and FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, the award-winning magazine that is celebrating its 67th anniversary in 2016, will again be offering copies of back issues to our members. Gordon’s magazine has been supporting PulpFest — and Pulpcon before it — for many years. We’re extremely grateful for the long-standing support of F&SF.

Radio Archives, the leading producer of old-time radio collections and pulp audiobooks, will be offering a free audiobook to each and every attendee of PulpFest 2016. To celebrate the launch of the new Airship 27 and Pro Se Productions lines of audiobooks, Radio Archives will be offering a free voucher — valued at $15 to $20 — through our registration packets. You’ll be able to choose any Airship 27 or Pro Se audiobook you like, with no restrictions. PulpFest is extremely grateful to Radio Archives, Airship 27 Productions, and Pro Se Productions for this very generous offer.

PulpFest itself will be holding a drawing at the close of our annual business meeting, scheduled for 9:20 PM on Saturday, July 23. Two lucky convention attendees who prepay for their membership, book a room for three nights at our host hotel, and choose to attend our business meeting will receive free memberships to PulpFest 2017. You must provide proof of your stay at the Hyatt Regency Columbus and be present at the drawing to receive your prize.

If you are not from the Columbus area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can try calling 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there are rooms still available. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor  or a similar website to find a hotel near the convention. Other sites include www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.phpcourtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, and the Experience Columbus lodging page at http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/stay Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

We’d also like to thank the many bookstores and comic shops throughout Ohio and other states, as well as the many book fairs and conventions that have helped to promote “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con” all through the past year. You’ve done a FANTASTIC job and we couldn’t have done it without you! Thanks so much!

(Joseph Wirt Tillotson, who signed his work “Robert Fuqua,” was AMAZING editor Ray Palmer’s favored cover artist from the get-go. Beginning with the October 1938 issue of AMAZING STORIES through the January 1944 number, Fuqua contributed nearly three-dozen covers — including the patriotic flag cover for the August 1943 issue — to the magazine and its companion title, FANTASTIC ADVENTURES.)

To Infinity and Beyond

Jun 15, 2014 by

Comet 1940-12A lengthy period of contraction followed the science-fiction and fantasy pulp boom of 1939. With the United States about to enter the Second World War and paper rationing limiting magazine production, the only new magazines to appear before the conflict’s end were the short-lived Comet, Cosmic Stories and Stirring Science Stories, plus rebound copies of Amazing Stories and Fantastic Adventures.

A British magazine entitled New Worlds was the first new science-fiction magazine to appear following World War II. Although it first appeared in 1946, it didn’t come into its glory until Michael Moorcock became editor in 1964. New Worlds would run for 222 issues and become the focus of science fiction’s “New Wave.” A companion magazine, Science Fantasy (later titled Impulse), premiered in 1950.

F&SF 49-FThe first U. S. magazine to appear after the war was Avon Fantasy Reader. Edited by Donald A. Wollheim, it was primarily a reprint magazine. The first new fantastic magazine would wait until 1949 when The Magazine of Fantasy–the “and Science Fiction” was added later–premiered in the fall. Originally edited by Anthony Boucher and J. Francis McComas and published by Lawrence Spivak, its founders sought to move away from pulp concepts, asking its writers for stylish fiction “that was up to the literary standards of the slick magazines.” Still published today, F&SF–as it has become known–has greatly helped both science fiction and fantasy to mature as genres. It is still published today.

Ray Palmer, most remembered today for his trumpeting of the Shaver Mystery in Amazing Stories and Fantastic Adventures, began publishing a couple of fantastic magazines around 1950. Although his first, Other Worlds, would publish a number of top-notch stories by Ray Bradbury, Gordon Dickson, Wilson Tucker, and others, Palmer would eventually convert it into a magazine about flying saucers. His other magazine was Imagination. It was sold to another publisher following its second number. Lasting for over sixty issues, Imagination published hurriedly written hack fiction by Randall Garrett, John Jakes, Frank M. Robinson and Robert Silverberg, all hiding behind pseudonyms.

Galaxy 50-10In the fall of 1950, World Editions introduced Galaxy Science Fiction, a digest magazine that paid its authors a minimum of three cents a word. Edited by H. L. Gold, the magazine serialized Alfred Bester’s “The Demolished Man” and Robert A. Heinlein’s “The Puppet Masters,” and published shorter works such as Ray Bradbury’s “The Fireman” (later expanded to become Fahrenheit 451), Damon Knight’s “To Serve Man,” and Fritz Leiber’s “Coming Attraction,” all in its first year. In 1953, Galaxy shared the first Hugo for Best Magazine with Campbell’s Analog. Later edited by Frederik Pohl, Jim Baen, and others, Galaxy ran for a total of 254 issues with its final issue appearing in 1980. Like F&SF, Galaxy was a leader in the movement to bring a more human element to science fiction.

Given the success of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and Galaxy Science Fiction, other publishers tried to cash in on the growing market. Most of them quickly folded. Some of the more notable magazines introduced during the fifites included If—particularly when it was edited by Frederik Pohl; Nebula Science Fiction—a Scottish magazine; Fantastic—started by Howard Browne for Ziff-Davis; Fantastic Universe—nicknamed “the poor man’s” F&SFBeyond Fantasy Fiction—a short-lived fantasy companion to Galaxy Science Fiction; and Imaginative Tales—a companion to Imagination.

Inifinity 55-11At the dawn of the space race, ten new science-fiction magazines entered the market. The best was Infinity Science Fiction. Edited by Larry Shaw, it published some good stories by authors such as Isaac Asimov, James Blish, Arthur C. Clarke, Damon Knight and C. M. Kornbluth. Other longer-lived magazines to premier during this time included Infinity Science Fiction, Satellite Science Fiction, and Super-Science Fiction. Although nearly fifty British and American science-fiction and fantasy magazines were introduced during the fifties, only four of the fifty–Galaxy Science Fiction, Science Fantasy, If, and Fantastic—lasted beyond 1960.

Omni 78-10Although science fiction continued to mature after 1960, the genre increasingly turned to low-priced and portable paperback books to extend its reach. Except for the reprint digests—Magazine of Horror and Startling Mystery Stories—little of note appeared in the form of a new magazine until Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine debuted in the spring of 1977. Still running today, it will soon publish its 463rd issue. Other notable magazines from the last quarter of the twentieth century are Omni—a slick companion to Penthouse that sometimes topped a million in circulation and published science articles alongside science-fiction stories; Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine—a companion to the men’s magazine Gallery, it sometimes sold more than 125,000 copies and featured a mix of traditional supernatural fiction and movie and television features; Interzone—a British magazine started in the spring of 1982 and originally modeled after Michael Moorcock’s New Worlds, it continues to be published today; Aboriginal Science Fiction—a magazine that debuted in 1986 and published many new writers; and Absolute Magnitude (originally entitled Harsh Mistress)—a semiprofessional magazine that debuted in the spring of 1993 and published “hard science fiction with a strong human element.”

Asimov's Science Fiction 2014-08Today, science fiction and fantasy have, by and large, achieved the respectability they long sought. At the same time, competition from a range of media including paperback books, movies, television, video games, e-books, and the Internet, has vastly diminished the scope of magazine fantasy and science fiction. The major science-fiction and fantasy magazines in the print format–Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Interzone, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction–have seen their circulations shrink tremendously.  Nevertheless, it cannot be denied that contemporary science fiction and fantasy owe a great deal to the magazines of the past—The Strand, Pearson’s Magazine, Argosy, The All-Story, Weird Tales, Amazing Stories, Astounding Science-Fiction, Galaxy Science Fiction, and countless others. Without them, where would science fiction and fantasy be today?

To learn more about the images used in this post, click on the illustrations. Click here for references consulted for this article.

The cover for Asimov’s Science Fiction is copyright © 2014 by Penny Publications LLC/Dell Magazines.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this discussion of magazine science fiction. If you’d like to read the unabridged version of the article–entitled “Science Fiction and the Pulps: A Genre Evolves”–it will be appearing in the PulpFest 2014 program book, The Pulpster. All you have to do to get a copy of the book is to become a member of the convention. It will take place from August 7 – 10 in Columbus, Ohio.

For those who cannot get to Columbus in August–although we’d love to see you–a supporting membership will be available that will entitle you to a copy of The Pulpster. You can register to become a regular or supporting member of the convention by visiting our registration page.

If copies are still available after the conclusion of the convention–quantities are limited–they will be available for purchase from Mike Chomko, Books. Visit our program book page to learn how to place your order.