Starting Today — A Daily PulpFest Post!

Jul 2, 2018 by

Since early April, we’ve had an announcement about PulpFest 2018 three days per week. Beginning today, we’ll have at least one post every Monday through Friday. We’ll be maintaining this pace through the beginning of the convention on July 26. We’ll even have an occasional weekend post and at least one post every day during the convention. PulpFest runs through Sunday, July 29, but even our promotion department needs a day off every now and then.

In future posts, we’ll discuss our free giveaways at the convention, highlights from this year’s issue of THE PULPSTER, our PulpFest 2018 dealers, and more, including our deal with ConfluencePittsburgh’s longest-running literary conference, with a strong focus on science fiction, fantasy and horror. It’s taking place the same weekend as summer’s AMAZING pulp con! All you have to do is show your PulpFest badge at the door and you’ll get ten bucks off your daily admission to Confluence.

So what are you waiting for? Don’t live on the edge! Register now for PulpFest 2018 by clicking one of the links on our home page! It’s the only way to be part of “Summer’s Great Pulp Con.”

While you’re at it, you can reserve a room at the beautiful DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry. Just below the PulpFest banner at the top of our home page, you’ll find a link that reads “Book a Room.” Click the link and you’ll be redirected to a secure site where you can place your reservationYou can also call 1-800-222-8733 to book a room by telephone. However, be sure to mention PulpFest to get the special convention rate. By staying at the DoubleTree by Hilton, you’ll help ensure the convention’s success. Given the convention’s popularity, we urge every member to book a room for PulpFest 2018 as soon as possible.

(During July and August 1942, just months after the United States entered World War II, magazines nationwide featured the American flag on their covers. Adopting the slogan “United We Stand,” some five hundred publications waved the stars and stripes to promote national unity, rally support for the war, and celebrate Independence Day.

For magazine publishers, displaying the flag was a way to prove their loyalty and value to the war effort. For the U. S. government, the campaign was an opportunity to sell bonds and boost morale. The magazines brought home a message of patriotism and ideals worth fighting for. The August 1942 issue of BLUE BOOK featured several flags painted by Herbert Morton Stoops. Also beginning in the same issue was H. Bedford-Jones fifteen-part series, “Flags of Our Fathers.” It would run through the October 1943 issue.)

Joe R. Lansdale on Philip José Farmer

Jun 17, 2018 by

Joe Lansdale likes writing introductions to the short stories in his collections. Readers like reading them. They provide interesting insights into what inspired Joe to write these yarns. In MAD DOG SUMMER AND OTHER STORIES  there’s one short story that is chockablock with references to popular fiction and authors. “The Steam Man of the Prairie and the Dark Rider Get Down: A Dime Novel” is dedicated to Philip Jose Farmer.

In his intro to the short story, Joe refers to his being inspired by a dime novel: “Frank Reade, the Inventor, Chasing the James Boys with his Steam Team.” In Joe’s short story there’s plenty of action, mayhem, violence with H. G. Wells Moorlocks, and imagery that is pure Farmer. Joe writes in his introduction:

“This story is a kind of tribute to the old stuff, with a touch of the new. There is also another influence. Philip José Farmer. If Burroughs is my sentimental favorite of all time, Philip José Farmer is my outright favorite.

He’s a mixed bag.

I don’t love it all. His prose ranges from sloppy to genius. But, good God, when he’s on, he can’t be touched. He has that sense of wonder, and he never lost it. He has the magic.

Bless him. He has kept the inner reaches of my heart alive with that sense of wonder and joy. He reminds me that sf, in the broader sense of its term, is in many ways the most wonderful form of fiction in creation.”

What better way to celebrate the 100th birthday of Philip José Farmer than by registering for Pulpfest 2018/FarmerCon 100? The Science Fiction Grand Master will be one of the main themes of the conventions, with plenty of programming about Farmer and his work. Additionally, the convention will be hosting Joe Lansdale — the author of over forty novels, numerous short stories, and the introduction to THE BEST OF PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER — as its its Guest of Honor.

You can join both conventions by clicking the Register for 2018 button on the PulpFest home page. And don’t forget to book a room at the DoubleTree while you’re visiting the PulpFest site. They’re going fast!

(Joe R. Lansdale’s MAD DOG SUMMER AND OTHER STORIES was first published in hardcover by Subterranean Press in 2004 — featuring jacket art by Timothy Truman — and reprinted in softcover by Golden Gryphon Press in 2006.

Former journalist Tony Davis — a reader and collector of the work of Joe Lansdale since the 1980s — will be interviewing our honored guest on Saturday evening, July 28, at 7:35 PM. Please join Tony and Joe in the PulpFest 2018 programming room at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry.)

Our Guest of Honor — Joe Lansdale

Jun 15, 2018 by

Beginning on Thursday evening, July 26, and running through Sunday, July 29, PulpFest 2018 and its partner, FarmerCon 100will honor both the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I AND the century mark of Philip José Farmer. We’ll be celebrating at the beautiful DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just outside Pennsylvania’s Steel City. But on top of all that, the convention will also be hosting champion Mojo Storyteller Joe R. Lansdale as its Guest of Honor!

The author of over forty novels and numerous short stories, Joe Lansdale’s work has appeared in national anthologies, magazines, and collections, as well as numerous foreign publications. He has also written for comics, television, film, newspapers, and Internet sites. His work has been collected in more than two dozen short-story collections, and he has edited or co-edited over a dozen anthologies. He has received the Edgar Award, ten Bram Stoker Awards, the Horror Writers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the British Fantasy Award, the Inkpot Award for Contributions to Science Fiction and Fantasy, and many other awards. His novella BUBBA HO-TEP was adapted to film by Don Coscarelli, starring Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis. His story “Incident On and Off a Mountain Road” was adapted to film for Showtime’s MASTERS OF HORROR, and he adapted his short story “Christmas with the Dead” to film himself. The film adaptation of his novel COLD IN JULY was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, and the Sundance Channel has adapted his Hap & Leonard novels for television. He is Writer In Residence at Stephen F. Austin State University.

Join PulpFest 2018 on Saturday, July 28, at 7:35 PM for a talk with Joe R. Lansdale. Joining the celebrated author on the PulpFest stage will be former journalist Tony Davis, a reader and collector of the work of our honored guest since the 1980s. Tony has been a pulp fan for even longer, starting with science fiction bedsheets as a teenager. The Ballantine and Ace Burroughs paperbacks, Bantam Doc Savages, and Lancer Conans of the 1960s led him to WEIRD TALES and other pulps.

At the Pulpcons of the early 1990s, I had the pleasure of meeting many wonderful people. One of those was the late, great Bob Weinberg. I was a big WEIRD TALES reader and collector and, boy, did Bob have a lot to relate to me about “The Unique Magazine.” It was on Bob’s recommendation that I started to buy dark fantasy books from specialized publishers like Dark Harvest and Mark V. Ziesing. And there was Joe R. Lansdale.

I started with a British edition of DEAD IN THE WEST, then BY BIZARRE HANDS, with the tipped-in plate and autograph (a Weinberg speciality). I was hooked. Soon I was reading Lansdale in TWILIGHT ZONE MAGAZINE and MIDNIGHT GRAFFITI. Then the books, often short story anthologies, were hitting the shelves of local book stores. Along came the Hap and Leonard series in paperback. By then, the East Texas scribe’s works were required reading for me.

Mike Chomko was always asking for recommendations for guests of honor for PulpFest. I’d wander by his dealer’s table every year and mention a few names, one of them being Joe R. Lansdale. And Mike would grin and say ‘Thanks Tony. We’ll see.’ Following PulpFest 2017, Mike emailed me and asked: ‘Would you be interested in doing our Saturday night interview? Our guest of honor is Joe Lansdale.’ My wife asked me what all the excitement was about after I’d emailed Mike back. ‘Joe Lansdale. I’ll be interviewing Joe Lansdale!’ Her response: ‘That’s nice, dear.’ So, here I am, a 65-year-old fan boy from Ontario, rummaging through all my JRL books and magazines to prepare for one Saturday night in July.”

Tony Davis has been attending pulp conventions since 1990. His first — Pulpcon 19 — led him to start THE PULPSTERthe longtime program book of Pulpcon, and now, PulpFest. Join Tony at this year’s PulpFest, taking place from Thursday, July 26, through Sunday, July 29 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry. In addition to our guest of honor, we’ll be hosting a rare gallery showing of original art by acclaimed writer-illustrator Mark Wheatley. There will also be author readings, a great programming line-up, two auctions featuring unique collectibles, and a dealers’ room filled with pulps, digests, and men’s adventure magazines, collectible paintings and illustrations, rare first editions, vintage paperbacks and comic books, unique films and more. All this, plus you can get ten dollars off the daily admission to Confluence. It’s taking place the same weekend as summer’s AMAZING pulp con! All you have to do is show your PulpFest badge at the door to Pittsburgh’s long-running science fiction, fantasy and horror conference.

You can join both PulpFest and FarmerCon by clicking the Register for 2018 button on the PulpFest home page. And don’t forget to book a room at the DoubleTree while you’re visiting the PulpFest site. They’re going fast!

(Tony Davis’s first Lansdale collectible was the British edition of DEAD IN THE WEST. A short novel featuring the Reverend Jebediah Mercer, it concerns the town of Mud Creek, Texas. It’s about to be attacked by a zombie horde, called up by an Indian medicine man, unjustly lynched by the town’s inhabitants. Originally serialized in four parts by ELDRITCH TALES #10 – 13, DEAD IN THE WEST was published by Kinnell in the United Kingdom in 1990, featuring jacket art by James Stewart.)

FarmerCon 100 — Philip José Farmer: His Influence and Legacy

May 30, 2018 by

Not only does 2018 mark the centennial of the armistice that ended The First World War, it is also the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Grand Master of Science Fiction Philip José Farmer. Beginning on Thursday evening, July 26, and running through Sunday, July 29, PulpFest 2018 and its partner, FarmerCon 100will honor both the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I AND the century mark of Philip José Farmer. We’ll be celebrating at the beautiful DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just outside Pennsylvania’s Steel City.

Few people think of Philip José Farmer as a pulp writer, but he was a child of the pulps and launched his career in the pulps. Before trying his hand at science fiction, he wrote mainstream stories. He sold his first story, “O’Brien and Obrenov,” to ADVENTURE magazine. It was published in the March 1946 issue. His first science fiction story, “The Lovers” — published in the August 1952 STARTLING STORIES — is famous for breaking the taboo on sex in science fiction. It launched his science fiction career and won Farmer the 1952 Hugo Award as the “Most Promising New Talent.”

Over a long career, Farmer continued to write and sell science fiction short stories to such pulps and digests as AMAZING STORIES, ARGOSY, BEYOND FANTASY FICTION, FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, GALAXY, THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, THE SAINT MYSTERY MAGAZINESCIENCE FICTION PLUSSTARTLING STORIES, THRILLING WONDER STORIESWORLDS OF IF, and WORLDS OF TOMORROW. He also wrote novels and published stories in anthologies. In 1967, he won a second Hugo Award for the story “Riders of the Purple Wage,” published in DANGEROUS VISIONS. Farmer was also one of very few writers to win both the lifetime achievement award from the World Fantasy Society and the Grand Master Award presented by the Science Fiction Writers of America.

When Philip José Farmer died on February 25, 2009 at home in Peoria, Illinois, there were countless tributes on the author featured in such diverse forums as LOCUS MAGAZINE and Tor Books to CNN and THE NEW YORK TIMES. PulpFest 2018 guest of honor, Joe Lansdale, credited Farmer with changing the face of science fiction. “I just can’t begin to tell you how important he is to the field as well as other fields,” Lansdale said.

Farmer’s legacy endures and continues to entertain his many fans and readers. Perhaps the best testament to this is the annual FarmerCon gathering, held at PulpFest since 2011. This year, we’re very pleased to welcome our FarmerCon members back to our joint conference, particularly during the centennial year of Philip José Farmer’s birth. We’ll be celebrating the occasion with an expanded FarmerCon programming schedule.

On Friday, July 27, at 7 PM our FarmerCon programming continues with “100 Years of Philip José Farmer: His Influence and Legacy,” a panel featuring authors Joe Lansdale and Christopher Paul Carey, artist and illustrator Mark Wheatley, and FarmerCon co-founder and Meteor House publisher Mike Croteau. They’ll be discussing the importance of the author to the fields of science fiction and fantasy, as well as his importance to the many fans and readers of his work.

What better way to celebrate the 100th birthday of Philip José Farmer than by registering for Pulpfest 2018/FarmerCon 100? The Science Fiction Grand Master will be one of the main themes of the conventions, with plenty of programming about Farmer and his work. Also planned is a rare gallery showing of original art by acclaimed writer-illustrator Mark Wheatley, plus the conventions’ Guest of Honor — Joe Lansdale — the author of over forty novels, numerous short stories, and the introduction to THE BEST OF PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER. You can join both conventions by clicking the Register for 2018 button on the PulpFest home page. And don’t forget to book a room at the DoubleTree while you’re visiting the PulpFest site. They’re going fast!

(In the late 1990s, one of the local newspapers published an article on Philip José Farmer. It was illustrated by a picture of the author, seated in front of some of his book cases. The same photograph was used for Farmer’s obituary in THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, a national British daily founded by Arthur B. Sleigh in 1855.)

Starting Next Week — 3 PulpFest Posts Each Week

Apr 2, 2018 by

Since the beginning of September 2017, we’ve had an announcement about PulpFest once a week. Starting next Monday, we’ll be releasing a post every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. We’ll be maintaining that pace until early July. Then we’ll have one post every weekday. Even the PulpFest promotion department needs a day off now and then.

During the next month, we’ll discuss such topics as our hospitality suite, the birthday of pulp artist Eugene Frandzen, related conventions, and our programming plans. PulpFest 2018 will be honoring the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended the First World War. The convention will be focusing on the so-called “war pulps” of the early twentieth century and the depiction of war in popular culture. We’ll also be saluting the centennial of the birth of Grand Master of Science Fiction Philip José FarmerJoin PulpFest 2018 and FarmerCon 100 for panels and presentations on the celebrated author of TARZAN ALIVE: A DEFINITIVE BIOGRAPHY OF LORD GREYSTOKEDOC SAVAGE: HIS APOCALYPTIC LIFE, the Riverworld and World of Tiers series, and many other works.

Our Guest of Honor will be award-winning author Joe Lansdale. The author of over forty novels and many short stories, Lansdale has also written for comics, television, film, Internet sites, and more. His novella “Bubba Ho-Tep” was adapted to film by Don Coscarelli, starring Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis. The film adaptation of his novel COLD IN JULY was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, and the Sundance Channel has adapted his Hap & Leonard novels for television. Joe will be talking with Tony Davis on Saturday evening, July 28. The author will also be available at select times during the convention.

So what are you waiting for? Register now for PulpFest 2018! There’s no other way for you to be part of “Summer’s Great Pulp Con.” While you’re at it, you can reserve a room at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry by clicking one of the links on the PulpFest home page that reads “Book a Room.” You can also call 1-800-222-8733 to book a room by telephone. However, be sure to mention PulpFest to get the special convention rate. By staying at the DoubleTree, you’ll help to ensure the convention’s success. Given its popularity, we urge every member to book a hotel room for PulpFest 2018 as soon as possible.

(Designed by PulpFest’s advertising director, William Lampkin, our PulpFest 2018 post card features the work of freelance artist Mel Hunter. His painting was originally used as the cover to the May 1960 number of THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION. Philip José Farmer’s “Open to Me, My Sister” was featured on the issue’s cover. PulpFest 2018 has used Hunter’s cover art to promote our convention at book stores, comic shops, and other conventions and fairs.)

Joe Lansdale is Coming to PulpFest

Oct 9, 2017 by

Champion Mojo Storyteller Joe R. Lansdale will be the Guest of Honor at PulpFest 2018. The author of over forty novels and numerous short stories, his work has appeared in national anthologies, magazines, and collections, as well as numerous foreign publications. He has also written for comics, television, film, newspapers, and Internet sites. His work has been collected in more than two dozen short-story collections, and he has edited or co-edited over a dozen anthologies. He has received the Edgar Award, ten Bram Stoker Awards, the Horror Writers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the British Fantasy Award, the Inkpot Award for Contributions to Science Fiction and Fantasy, and many other awards. His novella BUBBA HO-TEP was adapted to film by Don Coscarelli, starring Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis. His story “Incident On and Off a Mountain Road” was adapted to film for Showtime’s MASTERS OF HORROR, and he adapted his short story “Christmas with the Dead” to film himself. The film adaptation of his novel COLD IN JULY was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, and the Sundance Channel has adapted his Hap & Leonard novels for television. He is Writer In Residence at Stephen F. Austin State University.

According to Eric Benson, writing in February 2016 issue of TEXAS MONTHLY, Joe Lansdale got his start as a writer through the encouragement of his wife, Karen:

“My wife said, ‘Just take three months off and write — it’s what you want to do, just do it,’” Lansdale says. For the next ninety days, he wrote from morning until night, producing a story a day. Many were short: 3 to 4 pages. Others were shockingly long for a day’s work: 25 pages or more. At the end of the three months, Lansdale had nearly 1,000 pages of text. “They were some of the worst stories ever written; I was just flushing out all the crap,” he says. “But I learned to type real good.”

In 1976 he made his fiction debut, landing a detective story, “The Full Count,” with MIKE SHAYNE MYSTERY MAGAZINE. “More followed, mostly in MIKE SHAYNE, although it was hardly a living and it wasn’t his endgame.” Four years later, he sold his first two novels — TEXAS NIGHT RIDERS and ACT OF LOVE. Soon thereafter, he quit his day job to write full-time.

“Few writers can authentically claim to be their own distinct genre,” writes Lisa Morton in the October 2017 issue of NIGHTMARE MAGAZINE. “But there’s no question that Joe R. Lansdale is a category unto himself. He’s written award-winning horror, mystery, suspense, westerns, graphic novels and comics, media tie-ins, screenplays, and mainstream literature, yet each new work fits recognizably into the East Texas-slang-filled, fast-paced, fluid storytelling style that defines the Joe R. Lansdale genre.”

“I always felt that Ray Bradbury was kind of a role model for me, because he said, ‘Leap off the cliff and build your wings on the way down,’” Lansdale says. “That’s kind of what I’ve done my entire career. I’ve been told time after time, by editors and other writers, ‘Don’t do that, it’ll ruin your career,’ or ‘What are you doing? Stop writing that Batman novel. You’re getting recognition, this is the dumbest thing.’ But I like Batman. Sometimes I want to write the Batman novel.”

In 2018, PulpFest will celebrate the centennial of the birth of Grand Master of Science Fiction Philip José Farmer. Like Lansdale, Farmer was a genre all his own. In his introduction to THE BEST OF PHILIP JOSÉ FARMER, Joe Lansdale writes:

“No one, absolutely no one, is braver than Philip José Farmer. He’s willing to crawl out on most any limb. Like Tarzan, a name he was called as a child, he is willing to go where no one has gone before. At least as a writer. He’ll crawl out on that limb, be it rickety and weak and disease ridden, and he’ll not only crawl out there, he’ll stand up and grin at you.

Sometimes the limb breaks, but because of Farmer’s willingness to try anything, take any kind of chance, the results are often brilliant. Farmer is one of those handful of writers whose work, when it works, and on those rare occasions even when it doesn’t, that strikes sparks off the mind and sends you reeling into worlds and thoughts you might never have thought to explore.”

Farmer and Lansdale — two writers — both genres all their own.

Please join PulpFest 2018 from July 26 – 29 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry. We’ll be celebrating the century mark of Philip José Farmer, plus the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I. Of course, we’ll also be welcoming author Joe Lansdale. He will be talking with Tony Davis — editor emeritus of THE PULPSTER, winner of the 1999 Lamont Award, and a reader and collector of Joe Lansdale’s work since the mid-1980s — on Saturday evening, July 28, in the PulpFest programming room. Joe will also be available at select times during the convention.

(Joe Lansdale’s DEAD ON THE BONES — published by Subterranean Press in 2016 and featuring jacket art by Timothy Truman — is the author’s salute to the pulps and to pulp fiction. “I had no idea the pulps, by that point, were gone. I had no idea that they had existed, or even what a deceased pulp magazine looked like, but their leftover juice was in my blood, like unnamed parasites. . . . Now and again, however, I prefer to go back and dig into that pulp well in my head and come out with a story that might actually have appeared in those old, long defunct magazines. This book is an example of that.”

In addition to his writing, Joe is the founder of the martial arts system Shen Chuan: Martial Science and its affiliate, Shen Chuan Family System. He is a member of both the United States and International Martial Arts Halls of Fame. He lives in Nacogdoches, Texas with his wife, dog, and two cats.)