Happy Independence Day from PulpFest!

Jul 3, 2020 by

In a normal year, PulpFest would take the time today to say thanks for all of the donations received. Over the years, Chaosium Inc.Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, Radio Archives, and other generous organizations have donated their products as free giveaways to PulpFest attendees.

We’ve also used this day to thank the many bookstores and comic shops from the Pittsburgh metropolitan region where PulpFest is based, as well as book fairs and conventions throughout the United States that have helped to promote “Summer’s Pulp Con.” Although our promotional efforts were drastically reduced earlier this year, we’d still like to thank Books from the Crypt, Martin Grams, Jeff Harper, New Dimension Comics, Mike Chomko, Books, and Curt Phillips for helping to promote PulpFest during the last year.

Unfortunately, the COVID-19 virus threw a monkey wrench into all of our plans. Given the substantial risks involved and our desire to maintain the health and well-being of our many supporters, the PulpFest organizing committee voted unanimously to postpone this year’s convention until August 18 – 21, 2021.

Although there will be no PulpFest in 2020 and no items donated to give away to our attendees free of charge, we’d still like to celebrate freedom by offering our PulpFest 2020 postcards free to anyone interested as long as supplies last. Designed by the convention’s advertising director, William Lampkin, our postcards have become collector’s items in and of themselves. Bill has been creating these cards each and every year since 2011.

If you’d like a few copies of our PulpFest 2020 postcard, please send a business-size, self-addressed, stamped envelope to Michael Chomko, 2217 W Fairview Street, Allentown, PA 18104-6542. Requests from outside the United States will be honored, but it’s up to the sender to provide the correct United States postage.

(Our PulpFest 2020 postcard features Margaret Brundage’s cover painting for the October 1933 issue of WEIRD TALES. Brundage’s work — one of the most iconic images ever created for “The Unique Magazine” — illustrates the first segment of Edmond Hamilton’s four-part serial, “The Vampire Master.” The back of the postcard highlights the work of Norm Eastman. His painting — featuring models Eva Lynd and Steve Holland — was used for the cover of BLUEBOOK for October 1966.)

 

Regrets from Eva Lynd

May 6, 2020 by

Although PulpFest was looking forward to welcoming artist’s model Eva Lynd to the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, our 2020 guest of honor will not be able to attend our convention. Due to safety concerns, Eva, her publishers Bob Deis and Wyatt Doyle, and PulpFest have decided to cancel her appearance at PulpFest 2020. All agreed that it was wise for Ms. Lynd to avoid traveling by air in early August.

A frequent collaborator with Doc Savage model Steve Holland, our guest was born Eva Inga Margareta von Fielitz to Countess and Count Asti von Fielitz in 1937. She took the name Eva Lynd to help her acting career after emigrating to the United States in 1950.

Although some of her friends used to call her “Countess” and her brother — who still resides in Sweden — uses his title, Eva never considered herself to be royalty. Instead, she worked as a model for many of the top glamour girl photographers — Peter Basch, Wil Blanche, Herb Flatow, Leo Fuchs, Emil Herman, Morris Kaplan, Charles Kell, Lester Krauss, Earl Leaf, Ed Lettau, Jerry Yulesman and others. Alluring photos of Eva appeared in dozens of men’s pinup magazines, bachelor magazines and men’s adventure magazines. She also modeled for cover and interior photos published by “true crime” and detective magazines.

Eva was — and still is — an actress. Her television career included appearances on CAGNEY & LACEY, THE GARRY MOORE SHOW, HOGAN’S HEROES, PETER GUNN, THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW, THE TEXAN, and THE THIN MAN. She also appeared in several films — including THE HYPNOTIC EYE and THAT LADY FROM PEKING — as well as television commercials. Eva’s most remembered role was as the “The Girl in the Tube” — the gorgeous babe who emerges seductively from a tube of Brylcreem in the classic and award-winning commercial.

If you’re a fan of vintage men’s adventure magazines, you probably know that Eva was also a favorite model of artists Norm Eastman and Al Rossi, two of the top illustration artists who worked for the MAM market.

Eastman used the talented model for dozens of the cover paintings he created for the notorious “sweat magazines” published by the Reese and Emtee companies. Eva is frequently one of the scantily-clad, distressed damsels being tormented by sadistic Nazis, evil Japanese, communists, bikers, or aboriginals in the artist’s paintings. In others — such as our post card painting — she is a brave, gun-toting freedom fighter.

Rossi had Eva model for both men’s adventure magazine interior illustrations and for paperback covers. The most famous paperback cover painting by Al Rossi is the 1953 Ace Double paperback edition of William Burroughs’ early novel JUNKIE, published under the pseudonym William Lee. The artist also did the cover painting for NARCOTIC AGENT, the novel on the flip side of this very valuable Ace double.

Another of Eva’s frequent collaborators was the famed artist’s model Steve Holland, whose face and image appeared in hundreds of paperback and magazine cover paintings, as well as interior illustrations. Holland is best known as the model used by artist James Bama as Doc Savage on the covers of the Bantam paperbacks.

Although Eva Lynd never lived in a castle nor considered herself an honest to goodness countess, all of us at PulpFest believe that she has been absolutely majestic during the months that we’ve known her. It would have been wonderful to roll out the red carpet for “An Evening with Eva Lynd,” but that event will have to wait for another year. With regrets to her many fans, Eva Lynd will not be at PulpFest 2020.

(At PulpFest 2019, Bob Deis and Wyatt Doyle debuted an advance edition of EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL, specifically produced for the convention. A pictorial autobiography of Eva Lynd, the book features a cover painting by Norm Eastman. It was originally created for the December 1968 issue of NEW MAN. The modified painting is reproduced here, courtesy of The Rich Oberg Collection. NEW MAN was published by Reese Publishing from 1963 through 1965 and Emtee Publications from 1965 through 1972.

Many thanks to Bob Deis. His article, “(Re)Discovering Eva Lynd,” at the IDOL FEATURES website, was an invaluable resource for this post.)

Blondes Have More Guns

Jan 20, 2020 by

Meet Eva Lynd

PulpFest is looking forward to welcoming our 2020 guest of honor, model Eva Lynd, to the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry from August 6 – 9. A frequent collaborator of Doc Savage model Steve Holland, Eva was a favorite of artists Norm Eastman and Al Rossi, two of the top illustration artists who worked for the men’s adventure magazine industry.

Our guest of honor — who will be traveling to Mars, Pennsylvania on August 6 — will have a table inside the PulpFest 2020 dealers’ room. With that in mind, we’ve asked Wyatt Doyle — the ringmaster at New Texture books — to tell us something about Eva’s appearances in magazines, paperback books, and elsewhere. With Robert Deis, Wyatt is the co-editor of EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL and The Men’s Adventure Library series. Wyatt and Bob have offered very popular presentations on the men’s adventure magazines and their relation to the pulps at the last two PulpFests.

A Brief Guide to Collecting All Things Eva

by Wyatt Doyle

Men’s adventure supermodel Eva Lynd’s multi-faceted career began too late for the pulp magazine era. However, she was positively inescapable in the men’s adventure magazines that, starting in the 1950s, sprouted from classic pulp’s ashes. Her familiarity was further bolstered by regular appearances in (and on the covers of) other publications targeted to both sexes. These included confession and true crime mags, record album covers, and print advertisements, to say nothing of her growing visibility thanks to her busy television and film career.

With Eva appearing at this year’s PulpFest, collectors will be wise to review their archives for Eva Lynd appearances they may possess. While a complete checklist would be almost impossible to compile, we did our best to cover as much of Eva’s career as we could in our book EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL (New Texture, 2019). If you number among the unfortunates who don’t yet own a copy, here are a few career highlights and personal favorites to keep an eye out for in the months between now and PulpFest.

Modeling for Magazines

In the mid- to late 1950s, Eva did a great deal of photo modeling for magazines in the romance and “true confession” field, portraying a variety of lovelorn characters in titles like ROMANCE TIME and TRUE LIFE SECRETS. But as those magazines are not widely collected and infrequently discussed, they present a special challenge to Eva collectors. Those who’ve made fresh discoveries in this area are very much encouraged to bring their finds to PulpFest. Eva would be absolutely delighted to see some of these magazines again.

In TRUE ADVENTURES, September 1956, “The Monster We Couldn’t Kill,” by Duncan W. McLeod, recounts the life of frontiersman Simon Girty. The piece marks Eva’s first appearance in print as an artist’s model. Very recognizable in illustrator Al Rossi’s monochrome renderings, Eva portrays not one but both of Girty’s bound blonde captives. Eva quickly became one of Rossi’s favorite models, and she continued to appear in his illustrations well into the next decade.

STAG, February 1957, is a real bonanza, with Eva modeling for Rossi as the title character in the Wenzell Brown story, “Lily Brazil: Week-End Girl.” The resemblance to Eva in the artwork in particularly evident, and the story is punctuated with several smaller Rossi spot illustrations, all focused on Eva.

STAG, August 1957, includes Dave Ballard’s “The Sex Hoax That Scandalized Mexico.” The illustration marked the only occasion Eva worked with the great James Bama, and the lush results speak for themselves. The re-titled story and art were later reprinted in MAN’S WORLD, October 1960.

The September 7, 1957 edition of THE SATURDAY EVENING POST includes “Bring Back the Bride,” by Hannibal Coons. It’s illustrated with a jaw-dropping full color painting by Mike Ludlow of Eva in full Marilyn Monroe mode. The piece proved memorable enough to be swiped by an uncredited artist who copied it (badly) for the adult paperback, TORMENTED VIRGIN, by John D. Keefauver, and published by Epic in 1962.

FOR MEN ONLY, September 1958, includes “The Phony Empire of Lover Boy Leo Koretz,” by Sumner Plunkett. The black and white illo is particularly special; not only because it’s such an appealing rendering of Eva in lingerie, but because Al Rossi served as his own model for the character of “Lover Boy” Leo Koretz, depicted happily smoking a cigar in the bath. A unique comic snapshot of a very special collaboration.

Inside STAG, December 1958, is one of Eva’s very favorite pieces, a gorgeous blue duotone by Al Rossi for Oluf Reed Olsen’s WWII adventure, “You Will Never Come Back.” Eva appears with the iconic Steve Holland, her frequent modeling co-star.

MODERN MAN, January 1959, is adorned with one of Eva’s most seductive photo covers, shot by Leo Fuchs. A detail was featured on the cover of the softcover edition of EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL.

FOR MEN ONLY, July 1964, features another bonanza of terrific art: “Kill and Run Nude.” It features a big, two-page vertical spread of Eva and Steve Holland by Al Rossi, plus a half-dozen spot illos featuring both models.

ACTION FOR MEN, May 1966, included “Man Who Collected Nudes,” by Henry Kane, illustrated by a gorgeous Al Rossi rendition of a scantily clad Eva on the run. This image was subsequently tinted and incorporated into the cover of the EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL softcover.

Norm and Eva

Eva was a favorite model of pantheon artist Norm Eastman. In Eva’s estimation, Norm was the finest illustrator she worked with. Their simpatico working relationship led to Eva’s appearing on scores of Eastman covers from 1964 to 1974, sometimes as a bound captive of Nazi baddies, sometimes as a machine-gun-firing liberator, leading the charge to victory. Eastman tended to cast himself as the villains in his paintings, and an especially memorable example is the May 1965 MAN’S STORY. The cover not only features Eva as the model for both prisoners, but includes Eastman as a Nazi officer, and fellow illustrator Mark Schneider posing as his henchman.

For BLUEBOOK, October 1966, Eastman depicted cover girl Eva looking heroic and fabulous as an armed lookout for fellow saboteur Steve Holland, setting charges to take out a Nazi-controlled bridge. You’ll also find this image on the back of the PulpFest post cards advertising the 2020 convention.

The cover of NEW MAN, October 1968, saw Eastman cast Eva as a battlefield nurse, tending to a badly wounded Steve Holland while the Viet Cong close in on the dynamic duo. The cover is one of Eva’s personal favorites.

The November 1968 WORLD OF MEN cover by Eastman showcases a leggy Eva lashed to a palm tree, with threats of worse to come from SS officer Steve Holland.

NEW MAN, December 1968, is possibly the definitive Eva “hero” cover. This illustration of a cat-suited Eva opening fire on Nazi guards is a bona fide Eastman classic that’s also featured on the cover of EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL’s hardcover edition. PulpFest has also used it in their advertising material.

WORLD OF MEN, January 1969, sports another memorable Eastman “hero” cover, with Eva knee-deep in water to protect downed pilot Steve Holland. His crashed jet burns behind them.

Eva in Hollywood

Eva served as the body double for Kim Novak in the sexy key art for the 1957 film PAL JOEY. So what you’re seeing on the movie poster and the soundtrack LP’s cover is actually Eva’s body with Kim Novak’s face.

Eva makes a memorable appearance in the psychotronic cult film, THE HYPNOTIC EYE (1960, on DVD from Warner Archives). She also appears on many countries’ lobby cards for the motion picture. She has a cameo in the popular Sidney Poitier film FOR LOVE OF IVY (1968), and she stars in the difficult-to-see espionage caper THE GIRL FROM PEKING, aka THAT LADY FROM PEKING (1975). Stills occasionally turn up, but paper on this film — featuring Bobby Rydell and Sid Melton — is extremely rare.

The Paperback Eva

Some memorable appearances of Eva Lynd on paperback covers, all painted by Al Rossi:

NUDE IN THE SAND (1959) by John Burton Thompson (Beacon B253)

SUMMER WIDOW (1961) by Florence Stonebreaker (Beacon B394)

THE SEX REBELS (1964) by Christopher Storm (Signal Sixty B754X)

STRANGE LOVERS (1964) by Dan Bartell (Softcover Library S75151)

SEX FEVER (1965) by Val Munroe (Softcover Library B848X)

SUBURBIA AFTER DARK (1965) by Carlton Gibbs (Softcover Library B890X)

THE EMPTY BED (1966) by Louis Lorraine (Beacon Signal 8567F)

WOMEN’S WARD (1966) by Orrie Hitt (Softcover Library B914X)

Odds and Ends

During the late 1950s, Eva appeared on a variety of record album covers. These included the Mercury album EMOTIONS, featuring film and television composer Richard Shores and his Orchestra, with photography by Lester Krauss (1956); the Vienna State Opera Orchestra —  conducted by Argeo Quadri — Westminster Hi-Fi recording of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s SCHEHERAZADE (1956); Sam (The Man) Taylor and His Orchestra’s MUSIC FOR MELANCHOLY BABIES, released by MGM Records in 1957; and DREAMS OF A CONTINENTAL AFFAIR, recorded by Marcel Guillemin and His Orchestra and released in 1957 by Urania. Unfortunately, the photographers of the last three album sleeves are not known.

In 1959, the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel commissioned photographer Earl Leaf to shoot an oversized souvenir postcard, resulting in a beautiful 9” x 6” card of bathing beauty Eva Lynd poolside, reclining in vivid color. The cards were offered to guests of the hotel for years. Mail carriers around the world were happier for it. It’s a very special find for the collector who knows what to seek.

More recently, retro-focused designer Anne Taintor borrowed a glamorous photo of Eva from an ad featured in the December 1957 issue of PLAYBOY. Taintor married the photo to the caption “I love not camping,” and printed it on everything from luggage tags to clutch purses to serving trays to knee socks.

This is just the tip of the iceberg to “All Things Eva.” It’s important to remember that Eva did not keep any real records of her modeling assignments — she simply was too busy booking her next job. Even with our dedication to all things Eva, there are still appearances out there that Bob Deis and I haven’t seen. There are others that we don’t know about. So if you think you’ve found an Eva in the wild that we’ve missed, consider bringing it along to PulpFest for authentication by Eva herself. We’ll all be very interested to see if any lost treasures surface!

An Evening with Eva Lynd

On Saturday, August 8, the talented actress and supermodel will be joined on the PulpFest stage by men’s adventure magazine experts Bob Deis and Wyatt Doyle. They’ll be discussing the process of modeling for cover illustrations and interior illustrations for the men’s adventure magazines and other publications. This should be of great interest to pop culture enthusiasts as the process would have been similar to the experiences of the models who posed for the pulp fiction magazines. They’ll also be discussing Eva’s working relationships with artists Norm Eastman and Al Rossi, as well as fellow model Steve Holland.

So check your collections for Eva appearances and bring them to Mars, Pennsylvania for PulpFest 2020, August 6 – 9 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry. Our guest of honor, Eva Lynd, and her editors, Bob Deis and Wyatt Doyle, will be happy to see them and to meet you.

(Although PulpFest prohibits the sale of sexually explicit material — including PLAYBOY, PENTHOUSE, and OUI — the magazines Eva generally appeared in pre-date contemporary notions of “men’s magazines,” and their content is markedly different.

Norm Eastman’s original cover painting for NEW MAN for December 1968 — used as one of PulpFest’s web images — is courtesy of the Rich Oberg Collection.)

Bradbury, BLACK MASK, and Brundage

Nov 25, 2019 by

What Was Planned for the Canceled PulpFest

 

PulpFest is the summertime convention for fans of popular culture both old and new. It seeks to honor the pulps by drawing attention to the many ways these throwaway magazines have inspired writers, artists, film directors, game designers, and other creators over the years.

Although PulpFest 2020 has been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, we thought we’d leave up our planned schedule for a taste of what was meant to be another fine convention.

In 2020, PulpFest was to focus on a pair of creators and a magazine at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry in Mars, PA. We hope to announce our 2021 programming plans by the fall of this year. In the meantime, please check out what we were planning for this year’s gathering.

PulpFest 2020 will salute the centennial of author Ray Bradbury’s birth; the 100th anniversary of BLACK MASK — the pulp where the hardboiled detective story took root; and the 120th anniversary of the birth of WEIRD TALES artist Margaret Brundage. “Bradbury, BLACK MASK, and Brundage” have inspired and continue to inspire creators the world over.

And if three “B’s” aren’t enough for you, how about Burroughs, Brackett, Baum, and a couple of “B” movies?

So what’s your taste? Uncanny tales of wizards and warriors? Mysteries that leave you breathless? Dark demonic plots? Awe-inspiring intergalactic wars? They all have their roots in the pulps.

At PulpFest, you’ll discover new tales by the writers of Batman and Green Lantern. The novels that inspired STAR WARS. Horror tales that’ll freeze your spine and thrillers awash in enough blood to make Quentin Tarantino blanch.

Join us at PulpFest 2020 to find your next favorite read!

 

PulpFest 2020 Schedule

Thursday, August 6

Dealers’ Room
1:00 PM – 7:30 PM — Dealers’ Room Set-Up
3:00 PM – 7:30 PM — Member Registration and Early-Bird Shopping

Evening Programming
8:00 – 8:45 PM — Visions of Mars: The Early Years (Henry G. Franke, III)
8:50 – 9:35 PM — Science Fiction: To What Purpose? (David and Daniel Ritter of First Fandom Experience)
9:40 – 10:25 PM — BLACK MASK — The Early Years (Walker Martin and Ed Hulse) (1920 – 1940)
10:30 – 11:15 PM — Visions of Mars: The Pulp Years (Sara Light-Waller)
11:20 – 12:50 AM — Ray Bradbury’s THE BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS

Friday, August 7

Dealers’ Room
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM — Early Registration and Dealers’ Room Set-Up
10:00 AM – 4:45 PM — Dealers’ Room Open to All PulpFest Members

Afternoon Programming
12:00 – 2:00 PM — Visions of Mars — The Art of Barsoom  (Sponsored by The Burroughs Bibliophiles)
3:30 – 4:45 PM — Auction Preview
4:00 – 4: 50 PM — Bradbury in Oz — The Yellow Brick Road to the Pulps (Sara Light-Waller)

Author Readings
1:00 – 1:30 PM — Craig McDonald, author of the Edgar-nominated HECTOR LASSITER series
1:35 – 2:05 PM — Wayne Carey, contributing author of QUATERMAIN: THE NEW ADVENTURES, published by Airship 27
2:10 – 2:40 PM — Geary Gravel, author of JOHN CARTER OF MARS: GODS OF THE FORGOTTEN, published by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
2:45 – 3:15 PM — Win Scott Eckert, Wold Newton writer and author of TARZAN: BATTLE FOR PELLUCIDAR, published by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
3:20 – 3:50 PM — Christopher Paul Carey, Wold Newton author and Director of Publishing at Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.

Evening Programming
6:55 – 7:00 PM — Welcome to PulpFest (Convention Chairman Jack Cullers)
7:00 – 7:45 PM — Visions of Mars: The Modern Years (Albert Wendland)
7:50 – 8:35 PM — BLACK MASK — The Popular Years (John Wooley and John Gunnison) (1940 – 1951 and beyond)
8:40 – 9:25 PM — Ray Bradbury in the 25th Century (Donald Simpson)
9:30 – 10:15 PM — The Weird Tales of Margaret Brundage (Doug Ellis)
10:20 – 11:05 PM — Bradbury in Hollywood (Martin Grams)
11:10 – 11:55 PM — FarmerCon XV — The Many Adventures of Philip José Farmer (panelists to be announced)
12:00 – 1:30 AM — Ray Bradbury’s IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE

Saturday, August 8

Dealers’ Room
10:00 AM – 4:45 PM — Dealers’ Room Open to All PulpFest Members

Afternoon Programming
12:00 – 2:00 PM — Visions of Mars — The Art of Barsoom (Sponsored by The Burroughs Bibliophiles)
2:35 – 3:20 PM — News from Tarzana: Thrilling Updates from Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc. (featuring ERB, Inc. Director of Publishing Christopher Paul Carey and ERB, Inc. Vice President of Operations Cathy Willibanks)
3:25 – 4:10 PM — The Edgar Rice Burroughs Universe Expands: New Tales of Tarzan, John Carter, Carson of Venus, and More! (authors Win Scott Eckert, Geary Gravel, and Matt Betts, with ERB, Inc. Director of Publishing Christopher Paul Carey moderating)
3:30 – 4:45 PM — Auction Preview
4:15 – 5:00 PM — World-Building in Genre Fiction (authors Win Scott Eckert, Geary Gravel, Sara Light-Waller, and Joab Stieglitz, with Christopher Paul Carey moderating)

Author Readings
12:50 – 1:20 PM — Will Murray, licensed author of THE WILD ADVENTURES OF DOC SAVAGE and THE WILD ADVENTURES OF TARZAN
1:25 – 1:55 PM — Frank Schildiner, Wold Newton alternate history and continuation author of Carriere’s THE MONSTER OF FRANKENSTEIN series, published by Black Coat Press
2:00 – 2:30 PM — Matt Betts, author of CARSON OF VENUS: THE EDGE OF ALL WORLDS, published by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.

Evening Programming
7:00 – 7:30 PM — PulpFest Annual Business Meeting (meet the convention organizers)
7:30 – 7:45 PM — Munsey Award Presentation (presented by George Vanderburgh)
7:50 – 8:40 PM — Visions of Bradbury: The Author at 100 (Garyn Roberts)

7:30 – 8:30 PM — Registration for Auction Bidding by non-PulpFest Members
9:00 – 11:55 PM — Saturday Night Auction

Sunday, August 9

Dealers’ Room
9:00 AM – 2:00 PM — Dealers’ Room Open to All (dealers may be packing up; buying opportunities may be limited)

Please note that the schedule above is for informational purposes only. PulpFest 2020 has been canceled.

(Every year, PulpFest celebrates mystery, adventure, science fiction, and other forms of genre fiction. The rough paper magazines played a major role in the development of fiction categories. Pulp publisher Street & Smith pioneered the specialized fiction magazine when it introduced DETECTIVE STORY MAGAZINE in late 1915. Although DETECTIVE STORY emphasized the more traditional or “clued” detective story, it helped to pave the way for BLACK MASK and its gritty style of crime fiction.

Debuting in 1920, BLACK MASK would introduce the world to the hardboiled detectives of Carol John Daly, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and many other fine writers. The BLACK MASK style of storytelling continues to influence fiction writers to this very day.

Perhaps one of the most iconic of the BLACK MASK detectives was Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade. The character was the protagonist of “The Maltese Falcon,” a novel serialized in five parts, beginning with the September 1929 number of BLACK MASK. The issue featured cover art by H. C. Murphy.)

 

The Countess of PulpFest

Oct 21, 2019 by

If you were lucky enough to attend Martin Grams’s Mid-Atlantic Nostalgia Convention in September, you may have picked up a copy of our PulpFest 2020 postcard. On that card, we announced that a “very special guest” would be appearing at our 2020 convention.

We’re pleased to announce that our PulpFest 2020 guest of honor will be men’s adventure magazine supermodel, Eva Lynd. A frequent collaborator with Doc Savage model Steve Holland, our guest was born Eva Inga Margareta von Fielitz to Countess and Count Asti von Fielitz in 1937. She took the name Eva Lynd to further her acting career after emigrating to the United States in 1950.

In 1956, Eva began modeling for many of the top glamour girl photographers of the era — Peter Basch, Wil Blanche, Herb Flatow, Leo Fuchs, Emil Herman, Morris Kaplan, Charles Kell, Lester Krauss, Earl Leaf, Ed Lettau, Jerry Yulesman and others. Alluring photos of her appeared in dozens of men’s pinup magazines, bachelor magazines and men’s adventure magazines. She also modeled for cover and interior photos published by “true crime” and detective magazines.

Eva was additionally — and still is — an actress. During the 1950s and 60s, she appeared in episodes of THE GARRY MOORE SHOW, PETER GUNN, THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW, THE TEXAN, and THE THIN MAN. In later years, she appeared in HOGAN’S HEROES and CAGNEY & LACEY, as well as the cult movies, THE HYPNOTIC EYE and THAT LADY FROM PEKING. She has also been featured in various print ads and television commercials. Her latest was a commercial for Campbell’s Soup with her real life husband, actor Warren Munson. However, Eva’s most remembered television role was as the “The Girl in the Tube” — the gorgeous babe who emerges seductively from a tube of Brylcreem in the classic and award-winning commercial.

If you’re a fan of vintage men’s adventure magazines, you may know that Eva Lynd was also a favorite model of artists Norm Eastman and Al Rossi, two of the top illustration artists who worked for the MAM market.

Eastman used the model for dozens of the notorious “sweat magazine” cover paintings he created for the MAMs published by the Reese and Emtee companies. Most frequently in the artist’s paintings, Eva is one of the scantily-clad, distressed damsels being tormented by sadistic Nazis, evil Japanese, communists, bikers, or aboriginals. In some, she is a brave, gun-toting freedom fighter.

Rossi used Eva to model for both men’s adventure magazine interior illustrations and for paperback covers. The most famous paperback with a cover painting by Al Rossi is the 1953 Ace Double paperback edition of William Burroughs’ early novel JUNKIE, published under the pseudonym William Lee. The artist also did the cover painting for NARCOTIC AGENT, the novel on the flip side of this highly-valuable Ace double.

Both artists often had Eva pose with the famed male artist’s model Steve Holland, whose face and image appeared in hundreds of paperback and magazine cover paintings, as well as interior illustrations. Holland is best known as the model that artist James Bama used for Doc Savage on the covers of the Bantam paperback series.

Please join us at PulpFest 2020 on Saturday, August 8, for “An Evening with Eva Lynd.” The men’s adventure magazine supermodel will be joined on the PulpFest stage by Bob Deis and Wyatt Doyle — publishers of the MEN’S ADVENTURE LIBRARY book series. They’ll be discussing the process of modeling for cover illustrations and interior illustrations for the men’s adventure magazines and other publications. This should be of great interest to pop culture enthusiasts as the process would have been similar to the experiences of the models who posed for the pulp fiction magazines. They’ll also be discussing Eva’s working relationships with artists Norm Eastman and Al Rossi, as well as fellow model Steve Holland.

(At PulpFest 2019, Bob Deis and Wyatt Doyle debuted an advance edition of EVA: MEN’S ADVENTURE SUPERMODEL, specifically produced for the convention. A pictorial autobiography of Eva Lynd, the book features a cover painting by Norm Eastman. It was originally created for the December 1968 issue of NEW MAN. The painting is reproduced here, courtesy of The Rich Oberg Collection. NEW MAN was published by Reese Publishing from 1963 through 1965 and Emtee Publications from 1965 through 1972.

Many thanks to Bob Deis. His article, “(Re)Discovering Eva Lynd,” at the IDOL FEATURES website, was an invaluable resource for this post.)