Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention

Mar 23, 2020 by

The Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention 20 commemorates twenty years of pulp con excellence as it returns to the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center from September 11 to 13 this year. The convention doors open at 11:00 AM on Friday, but Early Bird Shoppers can get in 90 minutes early starting at 9:30 AM. The con suite will be open from 8:00 PM on Thursday, September 10, until midnight. The convention runs until 3:00 PM on Sunday.

This year’s show marks the centennial of BLACK MASK, the pulp that came to define the hardboiled detective and crime story genre, as well as the 90th anniversary of ASTOUNDING, Street & Smith’s pulp predecessor to today’s ANALOG SCIENCE FICTION AND FACT digest.

Additionally, there’s the annual Windy City Film Festival, organized and emceed by the one and only Ed Hulse of Murania Press. The Friday and Saturday night auctions will feature the collections of the Robert Weinberg Estate and the Glenn Lord Estate. The annual art show, panels, and New Pulp Sunday are also on the schedule.

Click on the link that starts our post to learn more about this year’s Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention or visit the convention’s Facebook page.

You don’t have to wait until September to discover pulp treasures. This year, Windy follows PulpFest 2020, “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con.” PulpFest 2020 will begin Thursday evening, August 6, and run through Sunday afternoon, August 9. It will take place just outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry. It’s easy to register, just click the register button below the PulpFest homepage banner.

(In conjunction with their host hotel, The Westin Lombard, the organizers of Windy City 20 have rescheduled their convention to early September to help assure the safety of its members. Please watch the Windy City homepage or Facebook site for additional announcements.

The revised Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention 20 promotional flyer was adapted from Fred Craft‘s front cover art for the December 1927 issue of BLACK MASK. From 1927 to 1936, Craft sold freelance artwork to pulp magazines, primarily to western and detective pulps. He is best remembered today for his extensive cover work for BLACK MASK, the magazine that PulpFest will be celebrating in August.)

Why PulpFest?

Jul 10, 2019 by

Today, we’re sharing a short essay written by Walker Martin for Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog. Walker has been a reader and collector for over sixty years. In 1997, he received the Lamont Award at Pulpcon 26 in Bowling Green, Ohio. We’re proud to have him as one of our own and can think of no one better to answer the question, “Why PulpFest?” Take it away Walker . . .

The last couple days I’ve been thinking about PulpFest, which will be held August 15 through 18 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. That’s about a month from now! I’ve been deluged by logical and sane-looking collectors and non-collectors all asking me the same question: why bother attending PulpFest? They have shown up at my house; they have called me on the telephone; they have sent me emails. Enough is enough! Here’s a list of excuses for not attending that I hear all the time, and why none of them are valid:

1 – I have no money! Sorry, but I’ve attended many a Pulpcon in the 1970’s, 1980’s, and 1990’s and I went with very little money. Are there no credit cards? Are there no credit unions? Are there no non-collecting spouses to borrow money from? Even when I had the money, I often blew it before the convention by visiting local bookstores like Bonnett’s and Dragon’s Lair in Dayton, Ohio. If not in the bookstores, then in the hotel rooms of friends who let me see what they were bringing to sell. I learned to go without much cash, but I brought a few boxes of pulps to trade and sell at my table.

2 – I’m in poor health and too sick to attend. Sorry again! I had a friend who had a terminal illness and came to Pulpcon anyway. Another friend actually collapsed at the convention and died soon after. I myself once threw my back out three days before the show and my doctor and chiropractor both told me to forget about making the long drive to the convention. I felt like I was crippled for life, but I managed to squeeze into the car and drive out. I had to stop numerous times near hotels because I thought I was not going to make it. Perhaps I could rent a room and lay there for a couple weeks until I could stand. It took me 16 hours instead of the usual 9 hours, but I made it. I spent the entire convention standing because sitting down caused back spasms.

3 – I have no space or I live in a small apartment. Collectors always make space for the things they love! When I first met Bob Lesser in the 1970’s he had an apartment full of Disney toys. This was New York City and the place was tiny. A path from the front door to the bed and another path to the bathroom. Otherwise, every inch was toys, robots, and paintings. I once ran out of space and I hunted for over a year until I found a bigger house. I went to dozens of open houses and looked at hundreds of houses. I finally found a big house. Unfortunately, I soon filled it up with books. Now I need a bigger place! The old story. . .

4 – My wife is a non-collector and forbids me to go. Tell me about it! I’ve been married over 40 years and I’ve heard it all. I still go and I still collect. Les Mayer told me in 1990 at the Wayne, New Jersey Pulpcon that his wife thought he was at a business meeting. If she knew he was at Pulpcon she might burn his pulps. Collectors have to become masters of deception and great liars to defeat the non-collector. Many a time I’ve lied and many a time I’ve smuggled books into the house in the dead of night while “she who must be obeyed” slept the innocent sleep of the non-collector. Non-collectors exist to be ignored . . .

5 – I can’t get off from work. Sorry, but this is not a valid reason. My employers always knew I was a rabid book collector who took off without exception a week for Pulpcon in the summer. I made sure that my vacation request was in as early as I knew the convention dates. Once they sorrowfully told me I couldn’t go because of some work bullshit. I went anyway and left it to them to ignore my absence without leave or put up with one pissed-off book collector. I realize the employment situation is different nowadays, but which is more important, your job or your collection? Your marriage or your collection? Right, your collection.

6 – Who cares about the convention? I can buy my pulps off ebay. Back in the 1920’s and 1930’s, dime novel collectors existed. But they didn’t have a convention and died off. Now I know of only a few in existence and dime novels are just about worthless. If I had a table full of dime novels priced at a buck apiece, most collectors would scurry away in disgust. We have to support the two big pulp conventions — Windy City in Chicago and PulpFest in Columbus. If we don’t, then one day we will wake up and the pulps will be dead. These shows garner a lot of attention and people keep talking about the pulps because of the efforts of Mike Chomko, Jack and Sally Cullers, Doug Ellis, John Gunnison, Bill Lampkin, Barry Traylor, William Patrick Maynard, and all the other people who lend a hand.

7 – It’s too late! Like hell. There are hotels with rooms available nearby. What’s the most important thing in a serious collector’s life? His collection, without a doubt. We work, we slave, we march on to the bitter end where we will eat dirt in the boneyard. We live lives of quiet desperation and worry about the afterlife. Go to PulpFest and collect some books and pulps! You only live once . . .

8 – And finally the best reason for attending! They are a hell of a lot of fun. Not only do you get to roam around a gigantic dealers’ room full of books and pulps, but you get to meet and talk to some of the greatest collectors and dealers. These will lead to future deals and contacts. Plus you can eat and drink with them! Though I seem to be one of last of the drinkers. And the panels! All day and all night, we will be discussing pulps and books. What’s cooler than that?

I’ve never met a magazine or book collector who regretted attending PulpFest. I hope to see some of you there!

(And so do we. The convention will take place from Thursday evening, August 15, through Sunday afternoon, August 18, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just outside Pennsylvania’s “Steel City.” Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2019. You’ll have a GREAT time!

If you don’t make it to PulpFest 2019 . . . The Shadow will know!

If you are not from the Pittsburgh area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can book your room directly through the PulpFest website. Below our banner, you’ll find a link that reads “Book a Room.” Click on this link and you’ll be redirected to a secure site where you can book a room at the DoubleTree. You can also reserve a room by calling 1-800-222-8733. Please be sure to mention PulpFest in order to receive the special rate. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the DoubleTree, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

Our lead image is based on George Rozen’s cover art for the August 1, 1933 number of THE SHADOW MAGAZINE. Walker Martin’s essay, “Why Attend PulpFest?” originally appeared — in slightly different form — on Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog on August 9, 2015 as the seventeenth segment of “Collecting Pulps: A Memoir.”)

 

Windy City Pulp & Paper

Mar 11, 2019 by

Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention commemorates the end of its teen years with its 19th convention. It will return to the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center from April 12 to 14 this year. The convention doors open at 11:00 AM on Friday, but Early Bird Shoppers can get in 90 minutes early starting at 9:30 AM. The con suite will be open from 8:00 PM on Thursday, April 11 until Midnight. The convention runs until 4:00 PM on Sunday.

This year’s show marks the 80th anniversary of PLANET STORIES, Fiction House’s interplanetary pulp. That’s not all, of course. As if you needed another reason to gather at Windy City, there’s the annual Windy City Film Festival organized and emceed by the one and only Ed Hulse of Murania Press, plus the Friday and Saturday night Auctions which this year features the collection of the Robert Weinberg Estate. There’s also the Art Shows, the Pulp Factory Awards, panels, author readings, and New Pulp Sunday.

You can bet your bottom dollar, you can lose your blues in that toddlin’ town. Click on the link that starts our post to learn more about the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention or visit the convention’s Facebook page. It’s the most fun you can have for an extended weekend this side of Mars.

While you’re at the show, pick up a PulpFest 2019 post card to learn more about “Summer’s Great Pulp Con.” The convention will begin Thursday evening, August 15, and run through Sunday afternoon, August 18. It will take place just outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry. It’s easy to register, just click the register button below our home page banner. Mars needs pulp fans. Don’t make them invade again.

(The 2019 Windy City poster was adapted from the May 1952 PLANET STORIES with front cover art by Allen Anderson.)

 

 

 

Why PulpFest?

Jul 17, 2018 by

Today, we’re sharing a short essay written by Walker Martin for Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog. Walker has been a reader and collector for over sixty years. In 1997, he received the Lamont Award at Pulpcon 26 in Bowling Green, Ohio. We’re proud to have him as one of our own and can think of no one better to answer the question, “Why PulpFest?” Take it away Walker . . .

The last couple days I’ve been thinking about PulpFest, which will be held July 26 through 29 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. That’s just ten days away! I’ve been deluged by logical and sane-looking collectors and non-collectors all asking me the same question: why bother attending PulpFest? They have shown up at my house; they have called me on the telephone; they have sent me emails. Enough is enough! Here’s a list of excuses for not attending that I hear all the time, and why none of them are valid:

1 – I have no money! Sorry, but I’ve attended many a Pulpcon in the 1970’s, 1980’s, and 1990’s and I went with very little money. Are there no credit cards? Are there no credit unions? Are there no non-collecting spouses to borrow money from? Even when I had the money, I often blew it before the convention by visiting local bookstores like Bonnett’s and Dragon’s Lair in Dayton, Ohio. If not in the bookstores, then in the hotel rooms of friends who let me see what they were bringing to sell. I learned to go without much cash, but I brought a few boxes of pulps to trade and sell at my table.

2 – I’m in poor health and too sick to attend. Sorry again! I had a friend who had a terminal illness and came to Pulpcon anyway. Another friend actually collapsed at the convention and died soon after. I myself once threw my back out three days before the show and my doctor and chiropractor both told me to forget about making the long drive to the convention. I felt like I was crippled for life, but I managed to squeeze into the car and drive out. I had to stop numerous times near hotels because I thought I was not going to make it. Perhaps I could rent a room and lay there for a couple weeks until I could stand. It took me 16 hours instead of the usual 9 hours, but I made it. I spent the entire convention standing because sitting down caused back spasms.

3 – I have no space or I live in a small apartment. Collectors always make space for the things they love! When I first met Bob Lesser in the 1970’s he had an apartment full of Disney toys. This was New York City and the place was tiny. A path from the front door to the bed and another path to the bathroom. Otherwise, every inch was toys, robots, and paintings. I once ran out of space and I hunted for over a year until I found a bigger house. I went to dozens of open houses and looked at hundreds of houses. I finally found a big house. Unfortunately, I soon filled it up with books. Now I need a bigger place! The old story. . .

4 – My wife is a non-collector and forbids me to go. Tell me about it! I’ve been married over 40 years and I’ve heard it all. I still go and I still collect. Les Mayer told me in 1990 at the Wayne, New Jersey Pulpcon that his wife thought he was at a business meeting. If she knew he was at Pulpcon she might burn his pulps. Collectors have to become masters of deception and great liars to defeat the non-collector. Many a time I’ve lied and many a time I’ve smuggled books into the house in the dead of night while “she who must be obeyed” slept the innocent sleep of the non-collector. Non-collectors exist to be ignored . . .

5 – I can’t get off from work. Sorry, but this is not a valid reason. My employers always knew I was a rabid book collector who took off without exception a week for Pulpcon in the summer. I made sure that my vacation request was in as early as I knew the convention dates. Once they sorrowfully told me I couldn’t go because of some work bullshit. I went anyway and left it to them to ignore my absence without leave or put up with one pissed-off book collector. I realize the employment situation is different nowadays, but which is more important, your job or your collection? Your marriage or your collection? Right, your collection.

6 – Who cares about the convention? I can buy my pulps off ebay. Back in the 1920’s and 1930’s, dime novel collectors existed. But they didn’t have a convention and died off. Now I know of only a few in existence and dime novels are just about worthless. If I had a table full of dime novels priced at a buck apiece, most collectors would scurry away in disgust. We have to support the two big pulp conventions — Windy City in Chicago and PulpFest in Columbus. If we don’t, then one day we will wake up and the pulps will be dead. These shows garner a lot of attention and people keep talking about the pulps because of the efforts of Mike Chomko, Jack and Sally Cullers, Doug Ellis, John Gunnison, Bill Lampkin, Barry Traylor, Chuck Welch, and all the other people who lend a hand.

7 – It’s too late! Like hell. There are hotels with rooms available nearby. What’s the most important thing in a serious collector’s life? His collection, without a doubt. We work, we slave, we march on to the bitter end where we will eat dirt in the boneyard. We live lives of quiet desperation and worry about the afterlife. Go to PulpFestand collect some books and pulps! You only live once . . .

8 – And finally the best reason for attending! They are a hell of a lot of fun. Not only do you get to roam around a gigantic dealers’ room full of books and pulps, but you get to meet and talk to some of the greatest collectors and dealers. These will lead to future deals and contacts. Plus you can eat and drink with them! Though I seem to be one of last of the drinkers. And the panels! All day and all night, we will be discussing pulps and books. What’s cooler than that?

I’ve never met a magazine or book collector who regretted attending PulpFest. I hope to see some of you there!

(And so do we. The convention will take place from Thursday evening, July 26, through Sunday afternoon, July 29, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just outside Pennsylvania’s “Steel City.” Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2018. You’ll have a GREAT time!

If you are not from the Pittsburgh area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can book your room directly through the DoubleTree website. You can also reserve a room by calling 1-800-222-8733. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the DoubleTree, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

Walker Martin’s essay, “Why Attend PulpFest?” originally appeared — in slightly different form — on Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog on August 9, 2015 as the seventeenth segment of “Collecting Pulps: A Memoir.”)

Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention

Mar 5, 2018 by

The Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention returns to the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center beginning with early-bird shopping at 10 AM on Friday, April 6. The dealers’ room will open to all at 11 AM. Additionally, the Windy City hospitality suite will be open on Thursday night, April 5, from 8 PM to midnight. You can pick up your registration materials during this time. The convention runs through Sunday afternoon, April 8, with its dealers’ room closing at 4 PM.

This year’s Windy will be celebrating the 90th anniversary of WINGS and the air war pulps. It will also be honoring the 125th anniversary of the birth of pulp publisher and editor Harold Hersey. As part of its celebration, Windy City has invited the award-winning and bestselling author F. Paul Wilson to be its Guest of Honor.

The Windy is noted for its substantial auctions; its art exhibition, sponsored by Illustration Magazine; and its extensive film program, organized by Ed Hulse of Murania Press. Once again, there will be “new pulp” panels and presentations on Sunday. This year’s Friday night auction will feature material drawn from the estate of Glenn Lord, the literary executor for the Robert E. Howard estate. You’ll find more details on the Windy home page.

Click on the link that starts our post to learn more about the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention or visit the convention’s Facebook pagePulpFest marketing and programming director Mike Chomko and volunteer coordinator Chuck Welch will all be attending Windy City. Stop by Mike’s table right next to the Adventure House booth and pick up a registration form for PulpFest 2018. He’ll be sharing his table with author Will Murray.

Chuck and Mike will be more than happy to answer your questions about this summer’s PulpFest. It starts on Thursday evening, July 26, and runs through Sunday afternoon, July 29. Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just nineteen miles north of the exciting city of Pittsburgh. You can book your room directly through the PulpFest website. Just click the “Book a Room” link on our home page or call 1-724-776-6900. Be sure to mention PulpFest in order to receive the convention rate. And we do hope to see you at Windy City!

Why PulpFest?

Jul 19, 2017 by

Today, we’ve decided to share a short essay written by Walker Martin for Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog. Walker has been a reader and collector for over sixty years. In 1997, he received the Lamont Award at Pulpcon 26 in Bowling Green, Ohio. We’re proud to have him as one of our own and can think of no one better to answer the question, “Why PulpFest?” Take it away Walker . . .

PulpFest 2017, July 27-30, Pittsburgh, Pa.

The last couple days I’ve been thinking about PulpFest, which will be held July 27 through 30 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. That’s just three weeks away! I’ve been deluged by logical and sane-looking collectors and non-collectors all asking me the same question: why bother attending PulpFest? They have shown up at my house; they have called me on the telephone; they have sent me emails. Enough is enough! Here’s a list of excuses for not attending that I hear all the time, and why none of them are valid:

1 – I have no money! Sorry, but I’ve attended many a Pulpcon in the 1970’s, 1980’s, and 1990’s and I went with very little money. Are there no credit cards? Are there no credit unions? Are there no non-collecting spouses to borrow money from? Even when I had the money, I often blew it before the convention by visiting local bookstores like Bonnett’s and Dragon’s Lair in Dayton, Ohio. If not in the bookstores, then in the hotel rooms of friends who let me see what they were bringing to sell. I learned to go without much cash, but I brought a few boxes of pulps to trade and sell at my table.

2 – I’m in poor health and too sick to attend. Sorry again! I had a friend who had a terminal illness and came to Pulpcon anyway. Another friend actually collapsed at the convention and died soon after. I myself once threw my back out three days before the show and my doctor and chiropractor both told me to forget about making the long drive to the convention. I felt like I was crippled for life, but I managed to squeeze into the car and drive out. I had to stop numerous times near hotels because I thought I was not going to make it. Perhaps I could rent a room and lay there for a couple weeks until I could stand. It took me 16 hours instead of the usual 9 hours, but I made it. I spent the entire convention standing because sitting down caused back spasms.

3 – I have no space or I live in a small apartment. Collectors always make space for the things they love! When I first met Bob Lesser in the 1970’s he had an apartment full of Disney toys. This was New York City and the place was tiny. A path from the front door to the bed and another path to the bathroom. Otherwise, every inch was toys, robots, and paintings. I once ran out of space and I hunted for over a year until I found a bigger house. I went to dozens of open houses and looked at hundreds of houses. I finally found a big house. Unfortunately, I soon filled it up with books. Now I need a bigger place! The old story. . .

4 – My wife is a non-collector and forbids me to go. Tell me about it! I’ve been married over 40 years and I’ve heard it all. I still go and I still collect. Les Mayer told me in 1990 at the Wayne, New Jersey Pulpcon that his wife thought he was at a business meeting. If she knew he was at Pulpcon she might burn his pulps. Collectors have to become masters of deception and great liars to defeat the non-collector. Many a time I’ve lied and many a time I’ve smuggled books into the house in the dead of night while “she who must be obeyed” slept the innocent sleep of the non-collector. Non-collectors exist to be ignored . . .

5 – I can’t get off from work. Sorry, but this is not a valid reason. My employers always knew I was a rabid book collector who took off without exception a week for Pulpcon in the summer. I made sure that my vacation request was in as early as I knew the convention dates. Once they sorrowfully told me I couldn’t go because of some work bullshit. I went anyway and left it to them to ignore my absence without leave or put up with one pissed-off book collector. I realize the employment situation is different nowadays, but which is more important, your job or your collection? Your marriage or your collection? Right, your collection.

6 – Who cares about the convention? I can buy my pulps off ebay. Back in the 1920’s and 1930’s, dime novel collectors existed. But they didn’t have a convention and died off. Now I know of only a few in existence and dime novels are just about worthless. If I had a table full of dime novels priced at a buck apiece, most collectors would scurry away in disgust. We have to support the two big pulp conventions — Windy City in Chicago and PulpFest in Columbus. If we don’t, then one day we will wake up and the pulps will be dead. These shows garner a lot of attention and people keep talking about the pulps because of the efforts of Mike Chomko, Jack and Sally Cullers, Doug Ellis, John Gunnison, Bill Lampkin, Barry Traylor, Chuck Welch, and all the other people who lend a hand.

7 – It’s too late! Like hell. There are hotels with rooms available nearby. What’s the most important thing in a serious collector’s life? His collection, without a doubt. We work, we slave, we march on to the bitter end where we will eat dirt in the boneyard. We live lives of quiet desperation and worry about the afterlife. Go to PulpFest and collect some books and pulps! You only live once . . .

8 – And finally the best reason for attending! They are a hell of a lot of fun. Not only do you get to roam around a gigantic dealers’ room full of books and pulps, but you get to meet and talk to some of the greatest collectors and dealers. These will lead to future deals and contacts. Plus you can eat and drink with them! Though I seem to be one of last of the drinkers. And the panels! All day and all night, we will be discussing pulps and books. What’s cooler than that?

I’ve never met a magazine or book collector who regretted attending PulpFest. I hope to see some of you there!

(And so do we. The convention will take place from Thursday evening, July 27, through Sunday afternoon, July 30, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just outside Pennsylvania’s “Steel City.” Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2017. You’ll have an AMAZING time!

If you are not from the Pittsburgh area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can book your room directly through the DoubleTree website. You can also reserve a room by calling 1-800-222-8733. Please be sure to mention PulpFest in order to receive the special rate. Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the DoubleTree, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

Walker Martin’s essay, “Why Attend PulpFest?” originally appeared — in slightly different form — on Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog on August 9, 2015 as the seventeenth segment of “Collecting Pulps: A Memoir.”) 

It’s Getting Windy: The Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention

Mar 20, 2017 by

The Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention returns to the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center on Friday, April 21, beginning with early-bird shopping at 9:30 AM. The dealers’ room will open to all at 11 AM. Additionally, the Windy City con suite will be open on Thursday night, April 20, from 8 PM to midnight. You can pick up your registration materials during this time. The convention runs through Sunday afternoon, April 23, with its dealers’ room closing at 4 PM.

This year’s Windy will be celebrating the 90th anniversary of the gangster pulps as well as Martin Goodman’s Red Circle pulps, the forerunner to Marvel Comics. As part of this celebration, Windy City has invited legendary comic artist Jim Steranko to be its Guest of Honor.

The Windy is noted for its substantial auctions; its art exhibition, sponsored by Illustration Magazine; and its extensive film program, organized by Ed Hulse of Murania Press. Once again, there will be “new pulp” panels and readings on Sunday, running from 10 AM until 3 PM.

Click on the link that starts our post to learn more about the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention or visit the convention’s Facebook pagePulpFest chairman Jack Cullers, volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers, technology director Chuck Welch, and marketing and programming director Mike Chomko will all be attending Windy City. Stop by Mike’s table right next to the Adventure House booth and pick up a registration form for PulpFest 2017. Jack, Sally, Chuck, and Mike will be more than happy to answer your questions about this summer’s pulp con, beginning on Thursday evening, July 27, and running through Sunday afternoon, July 30, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh – Cranberry, just nineteen miles north of the exciting city of Pittsburgh. Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2017. You can book your room directly through the PulpFest website. Just click the “Book a Room for 2017” link on our home page or call 1-800-222-8733. Be sure to mention PulpFest in order to receive the convention rate. And we do hope to see you at Windy City!

(As pulp historian John Locke has written elsewhere, “In 1929, a new kind of magazine appeared on newsstands: the gang pulps! And nothing that came before gave the pulps a worse reputation. Month after month, the stories luridly recounted the exploits of the most sadistic killers, the most craven squealers, the most coldblooded gun molls, the most corrupt cops, the most ruthless gang bosses, the most brutal mob wars, that ever escaped the realm of the imagination — a genre of extremes. There had been outlaw heroes in crime fiction before, but none like this new breed, who toasted with bootleg liquor while their bloody victims lay dying on the floor. Almost immediately, the gang pulps came under attack from the censors. America’s morals lay dying on the pulpwood pages, they claimed.

Centered in the crosshairs was famed pulp editor Harold Hersey, creator of GANGSTER STORIES, RACKETEER STORIES, SPEAKEASY STORIES and a raft of other gang magazines.” Another Hersey title was GANGLAND STORIES — its January – February 1932 issue pictured here — which often featured cover art by Walter Baumhofer.)

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Why PulpFest?

Jul 13, 2016 by

Today, we’ve decided to share a short essay written by Walker Martin for Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog. Walker has been a reader and collector for over sixty years. In 1997, he received the Lamont Award at Pulpcon 26 in Bowling Green, Ohio. We’re proud to have him as one of our own and can think of no one better to answer the question, “Why PulpFest?” Take it away Walker . . .

PulpFest 2016 — Summer's AMAZING Pulp Con!

The last couple days I’ve been thinking about PulpFest, which will be held July 21 through 24 in Columbus Ohio. That’s just a week from tomorrow! I’ve been deluged by logical and sane-looking collectors and non-collectors all asking me the same question: why bother attending PulpFest? They have shown up at my house; they have called me on the telephone; they have sent me emails. Enough is enough! Here’s a list of excuses for not attending that I hear all the time, and why none of them are valid:

1 – I have no money! Sorry, but I’ve attended many a Pulpcon in the 1970’s, 1980’s, and 1990’s and I went with very little money. Are there no credit cards? Are there no credit unions? Are there no non-collecting spouses to borrow money from? Even when I had the money, I often blew it before the convention by visiting local bookstores like Bonnett’s and Dragon’s Lair in Dayton, Ohio. If not in the bookstores, then in the hotel rooms of friends who let me see what they were bringing to sell. I learned to go without much cash, but I brought a few boxes of pulps to trade and sell at my table.

2 – I’m in poor health and too sick to attend. Sorry again! I had a friend who had a terminal illness and came to Pulpcon anyway. Another friend actually collapsed at the convention and died soon after. I myself once threw my back out three days before the show and my doctor and chiropractor both told me to forget about making the long drive to the convention. I felt like I was crippled for life, but I managed to squeeze into the car and drive out. I had to stop numerous times near hotels because I thought I was not going to make it. Perhaps I could rent a room and lay there for a couple weeks until I could stand. It took me 16 hours instead of the usual 9 hours, but I made it. I spent the entire convention standing because sitting down caused back spasms.

3 – I have no space or I live in a small apartment. Collectors always make space for the things they love! When I first met Bob Lesser in the 1970’s he had an apartment full of Disney toys. This was New York City and the place was tiny. A path from the front door to the bed and another path to the bathroom. Otherwise, every inch was toys, robots, and paintings. I once ran out of space and I hunted for over a year until I found a bigger house. I went to dozens of open houses and looked at hundreds of houses. I finally found a big house. Unfortunately, I soon filled it up with books. Now I need a bigger place! The old story. . .

4 – My wife is a non-collector and forbids me to go. Tell me about it! I’ve been married over 40 years and I’ve heard it all. I still go and I still collect. Les Mayer told me in 1990 at the Wayne, New Jersey Pulpcon that his wife thought he was at a business meeting. If she knew he was at Pulpcon she might burn his pulps. Collectors have to become masters of deception and great liars to defeat the non-collector. Many a time I’ve lied and many a time I’ve smuggled books into the house in the dead of night while “she who must be obeyed” slept the innocent sleep of the non-collector. Non-collectors exist to be ignored . . .

5 – I can’t get off from work. Sorry, but this is not a valid reason. My employers always knew I was a rabid book collector who took off without exception a week for Pulpcon in the summer. I made sure that my vacation request was in as early as I knew the convention dates. Once they sorrowfully told me I couldn’t go because of some work bullshit. I went anyway and left it to them to ignore my absence without leave or put up with one pissed-off book collector. I realize the employment situation is different nowadays, but which is more important, your job or your collection? Your marriage or your collection? Right, your collection.

6 – Who cares about the convention? I can buy my pulps off ebay. Back in the 1920’s and 1930’s, dime novel collectors existed. But they didn’t have a convention and died off. Now I know of only a few in existence and dime novels are just about worthless. If I had a table full of dime novels priced at a buck apiece, most collectors would scurry away in disgust. We have to support the two big pulp conventions — Windy City in Chicago and PulpFest in Columbus. If we don’t, then one day we will wake up and the pulps will be dead. These shows garner a lot of attention and people keep talking about the pulps because of the efforts of Mike Chomko, Jack and Sally Cullers, Doug Ellis, John Gunnison, Bill Lampkin, Barry Traylor, Chuck Welch, and all the other people who lend a hand.

7 – It’s too late! Like hell. There are hotels with rooms available nearby. What’s the most important thing in a serious collector’s life? His collection, without a doubt. We work, we slave, we march on to the bitter end where we will eat dirt in the boneyard. We live lives of quiet desperation and worry about the afterlife. Go to PulpFest and collect some books and pulps! You only live once . . .

8 – And finally the best reason for attending! They are a hell of a lot of fun. Not only do you get to roam around a gigantic dealers’ room full of books and pulps, but you get to meet and talk to some of the greatest collectors and dealers. These will lead to future deals and contacts. Plus you can eat and drink with them! Though I seem to be one of last of the drinkers. And the panels! All day and all night, we will be discussing pulps and books. What’s cooler than that?

I’ve never met a magazine or book collector who regretted attending PulpFest. I hope to see some of you there!

(And so do we. The convention will take place from Thursday evening, July 21, through Sunday afternoon, July 24, in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2016. You’ll have an AMAZING time!

If you are not from the Columbus area and have yet to book your room for this year’s PulpFest, you can try calling 1-888-421-1442 to reach the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps there are rooms still available. Alternately, you can search for a room at tripadvisor  or a similar website to find a hotel. Other sites include www.columbusconventions.com/thearea.php, courtesy of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, and the Experience Columbus lodging page at http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/stay.  Thanks so much to everyone who has reserved a room at our host hotel. By staying at the Hyatt Regency, you’ve helped to ensure the convention’s success.

Walker Martin’s essay, “Why Attend PulpFest?” originally appeared — in slightly different form — on Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog on August 9, 2015 as the seventeenth segment of “Collecting Pulps: A Memoir.) 

 

It’s Getting Windy! The Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention

Mar 28, 2016 by

Amazing Stories 26-04The Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention returns to the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center on Friday, April 22nd, beginning with early-bird shopping at 9:30 AM. The dealers’ room will open to all at 11 AM. The convention runs through Sunday afternoon, April 24th, with its dealers’ room closing at 4 PM. Like PulpFest, this year’s Windy will be celebrating the 90th anniversary of the first science-fiction magazine, AMAZING STORIES.

The Windy City con suite will also be open on Thursday night, April 21st, from 8 PM to midnight. You can pick up your registration materials during this period of time.

The Windy is noted for its substantial auctions; its art exhibition, sponsored by Illustration Magazine; and its extensive film program, organized by Ed Hulse of Murania Press. Once again, there will be “new pulp” panels and readings on Sunday, running from 10 AM until 3 PM. There will also be one panel each on Friday and Saturday evenings.

Click on the link above to learn more about the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention or visit the convention’s Facebook page at http://windycitypulpandpaper.com/home/PulpFest chairman Jack Cullers, volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers, and marketing and programming director Mike Chomko will all be attending Windy City. Stop by their tables right next to the Adventure House booth and pick up a registration form for this year’s PulpFest. Technology director Chuck Welch may also be present. Jack, Sally, Chuck, and Mike will be more than happy to answer your questions about “Summer’s AMAZING Pulp Con,” taking place from Thursday evening, July 21st and running through Sunday afternoon, July 24th in the Columbus, Ohio Arena district at the Hyatt Regency hotel and the city’s spacious convention center. Start making your plans to join us at the “pop culture center of the universe” for PulpFest 2016. And we do hope to see you at Windy City!

(The first issue of the first science-fiction pulp — AMAZING STORIES — was cover-dated April 1926. Hugo Gernsback both edited and published the magazine. His most favored artist was Frank R. Paul — now known as the “grandfather of science-fiction art” — who painted both the first and the last covers of the Gernsback AMAZING. The final issue of Gernsback’s AMAZING was dated April 1929.)

Soon It’s Getting Windy!

Mar 19, 2015 by

Astounding Stories 36-02We hope everyone who will be attending the Los Angeles Vintage Paperback Collectors Show over the coming weekend will have a great time. With over fifty authors and artists scheduled to attend, you’re bound to enjoy yourselves. Back east, we’re expecting snow. But in less than a month, it will be getting Windy.

The Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention returns to the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center on Friday, April 17th, beginning with early-bird shopping at 9:30 AM. The convention runs through Sunday afternoon, April 19th, with its dealers’ room closing at 4 PM. Like PulpFest, this year’s Windy will be celebrating the 125th anniversary of H. P. Lovecraft’s birth.

The Windy is noted for its substantial auctions; its art exhibition, sponsored by Illustration Magazine; and its extensive film program, organized by Ed Hulse of Murania Press.

Click on the link above to learn more about the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention or visit the convention’s Facebook page by clicking herePulpFest chairman Jack Cullers, volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers, and marketing and programming director Mike Chomko will all be attending Windy City. Stop by their tables right next to John and Maureen Gunnison’s Adventure House tables and pick up a registration form for this year’s PulpFest. Jack, Sally, and Mike will be more than happy to answer your questions about “Summer’s Great Pulp Con,” taking place from Thursday evening, August 13th and running through Sunday afternoon, August 16th at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Columbus, Ohio. Click here to book your room.

(Howard V. Brown painted the front cover art for the February 1936 issue of ASTOUNDING STORIES, published by Street & Smith. The issue featured the beginning of H. P. Lovecraft’s novel, “At the Mountains of Madness,” serialized in three monthly segments.)

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